Château de Versailles

Versailles, France

The Château de Versailles, which has been on UNESCO’s World Heritage List for 30 years, is one of the most beautiful achievements of 18th-century French art. The site began as Louis XIII’s hunting lodge before his son Louis XIV transformed and expanded it, moving the court and government of France to Versailles in 1682. Each of the three French kings who lived there until the French Revolution added improvements to make it more beautiful.

The Hall of Mirrors, the King’s Grand Apartments, the Museum of the History of France. The Château de Versailles, the seat of power until 1789, has continued to unfurl its splendour over the course of centuries. At first it was just a humble hunting lodge built by Louis XIII. But Louis XIV chose the site to build the palace we know today, the symbol of royal absolutism and embodiment of classical French art.

In the 1670s Louis XIV built the Grand Apartments of the King and Queen, whose most emblematic achievement is the Hall of Mirrors designed by Mansart, where the king put on his most ostentatious display of royal power in order to impress visitors. The Chapel and Opera were built in the next century under Louis XV.

The château lost its standing as the official seat of power in 1789 but acquired a new role in the 19th century as the Museum of the History of France, which was founded at the behest of Louis-Philippe, who ascended to the throne in 1830. That is when many of the château’s rooms were taken over to house the new collections, which were added to until the early 20th century, tracing milestones in French history.

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Founded: 1682
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

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User Reviews

Rajesh (21 months ago)
The palace of Versailles happens to be a lavish complex and a former residence of the royal kingdom outside the city of Paris. The palace of Versailles is located at a distance of 10 Km from the city centre of Paris.  The structure has deep connections with the political history of Paris as it represents an age in the history of French's rise as a power and fashion centre in the world.
Satish Patel (2 years ago)
The French monarchy’s principal residence up until the French Revolution, the Palace of Versailles is truly a sight to behold. From the stunning Hall of Mirrors to the palace’s perfectly manicured gardens, there’s no shortage of things to explore. For a behind the scenes peek into how the Royals lived, this exclusive VIP tour takes you into the Palace’s Royal Quarters.
Tej Jethwa (2 years ago)
Amazing place to visit. Well controlled and safe during CV19 times. Gardens are lovely to explore and see. Definitely MUST come and visit here if close to Paris. Parking can get busy so best to arrive early
강재현 (2 years ago)
It was the most memorable place during my trip to France and the exterior stood out because of its splendid appearance, but the interior was even more splendid, surprising. Especially, the size of the garden, which was larger than the interior area of the palace, was very surprising. It's a must-visit place if you go on a trip to France.
Denny and Angelina Johnson (2 years ago)
Enjoyed our visit! I wish we could have seen more of the rooms for the price. Even the secret passages! They really need to incorporate those passages somehow! They are amazing! It was busy, but was beautiful! Wear good shoes..
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