The Neues Museum ('New Museum') was built between 1843 and 1855 according to plans by Friedrich August Stüler, a student of Karl Friedrich Schinkel. The museum was closed at the beginning of World War II in 1939, and was heavily damaged during the bombing of Berlin. The rebuilding was overseen by the English architect David Chipperfield.

Exhibits include the Egyptian and Prehistory and Early History collections, as it did before the war. The artifacts it houses include the iconic bust of the Egyptian queen Nefertiti.

Both as a part of the Museum Island complex, and as an individual building, the museum testifies to the neoclassical architecture of museums in the 19th century. With its new industrialized building procedures and its use of iron construction, the museum plays an important role in the history of technology. Since the classical and ornate interiors of the Glyptothek and of the Alte Pinakothek in Munich were destroyed in World War II, the partly destroyed interior of the Neues Museum ranks among the last remaining examples of interior museum layout of this period in Germany.

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Address

Bodestraße 1, Berlin, Germany
See all sites in Berlin

Details

Founded: 1855
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rebecca Gausnell (8 months ago)
Very nice museum. Very interesting design. But very big. I still knew the Egyptian museum wanted to show it to my daughter. Now we would have to go there. But you really have to plan a lot of time. But it is definitely worth it!
Otto Bedo (8 months ago)
wonderful place with a thought out setup. if interested in natural history, this is a place for you then :) I’d suggest going up to the 3rd floor and starting from there all the way to the basement, this is the most fluid way in my opinion to enjoy what the museum offers!
Ian Allen (9 months ago)
Fascinating museum—not so much because of the artifacts housed there but rather because of the design of the museum itself. The redesign by David Chipperfield is exceptional and a wonder to behold—each room is thoughtfully imagined. While this museum will definitely interest those looking for ancient Egyptian items, it will also be of interest to students and admirers of architecture.
Vlada Martikova (9 months ago)
Very nice museum and decorations in the room. It is quite big, so if you want to hear(they give you headphones for free at the entrance) or read about everything, you will probably need more than 2 hours. I rate it 4 stars because they close 15 min before it is indicated so we couldn't see the last floor, which we planned to leave for the end for a quick glance, and it was disappointing. Also, it is prohibited to take pictures of the bust of Nefertiti. Anyhow, especially if you are into Egyptian mythology, it is definitely a worth visiting museum.
Christian Domini (9 months ago)
From what I gather this museum is more about the museum itself and some old antiques they still have. You do have the Nefertiti bust and the Golden hat but either than that it explains how most of the museum artifacts and the museum itself has been lost and renovate through the years. I bet the museum was amazing 100 years ago now is okay. I did spend almost 4 hours in it though
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