The Neues Museum ('New Museum') was built between 1843 and 1855 according to plans by Friedrich August Stüler, a student of Karl Friedrich Schinkel. The museum was closed at the beginning of World War II in 1939, and was heavily damaged during the bombing of Berlin. The rebuilding was overseen by the English architect David Chipperfield.

Exhibits include the Egyptian and Prehistory and Early History collections, as it did before the war. The artifacts it houses include the iconic bust of the Egyptian queen Nefertiti.

Both as a part of the Museum Island complex, and as an individual building, the museum testifies to the neoclassical architecture of museums in the 19th century. With its new industrialized building procedures and its use of iron construction, the museum plays an important role in the history of technology. Since the classical and ornate interiors of the Glyptothek and of the Alte Pinakothek in Munich were destroyed in World War II, the partly destroyed interior of the Neues Museum ranks among the last remaining examples of interior museum layout of this period in Germany.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Bodestraße 1, Berlin, Germany
See all sites in Berlin

Details

Founded: 1855
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rebecca Gausnell (2 years ago)
Very nice museum. Very interesting design. But very big. I still knew the Egyptian museum wanted to show it to my daughter. Now we would have to go there. But you really have to plan a lot of time. But it is definitely worth it!
Otto Bedo (2 years ago)
wonderful place with a thought out setup. if interested in natural history, this is a place for you then :) I’d suggest going up to the 3rd floor and starting from there all the way to the basement, this is the most fluid way in my opinion to enjoy what the museum offers!
Ian Allen (2 years ago)
Fascinating museum—not so much because of the artifacts housed there but rather because of the design of the museum itself. The redesign by David Chipperfield is exceptional and a wonder to behold—each room is thoughtfully imagined. While this museum will definitely interest those looking for ancient Egyptian items, it will also be of interest to students and admirers of architecture.
Vlada Martikova (2 years ago)
Very nice museum and decorations in the room. It is quite big, so if you want to hear(they give you headphones for free at the entrance) or read about everything, you will probably need more than 2 hours. I rate it 4 stars because they close 15 min before it is indicated so we couldn't see the last floor, which we planned to leave for the end for a quick glance, and it was disappointing. Also, it is prohibited to take pictures of the bust of Nefertiti. Anyhow, especially if you are into Egyptian mythology, it is definitely a worth visiting museum.
Christian Domini (2 years ago)
From what I gather this museum is more about the museum itself and some old antiques they still have. You do have the Nefertiti bust and the Golden hat but either than that it explains how most of the museum artifacts and the museum itself has been lost and renovate through the years. I bet the museum was amazing 100 years ago now is okay. I did spend almost 4 hours in it though
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Holy Trinity Column

The Holy Trinity Column in Olomouc is a Baroque monument built in 1716–1754 in honour of God. The main purpose was a spectacular celebration of Catholic Church and faith, partly caused by feeling of gratitude for ending a plague, which struck Moravia between 1713 and 1715. The column was also understood to be an expression of local patriotism, since all artists and master craftsmen working on this monument were Olomouc citizens, and almost all depicted saints were connected with the city of Olomouc in some way. The column is the biggest Baroque sculptural group in the Czech Republic. In 2000 it was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage Sites list.

The column is dominated by gilded copper sculptures of the Holy Trinity accompanied by the Archangel Gabriel on the top and the Assumption of the Virgin beneath it.

The base of the column, in three levels, is surrounded by 18 more stone sculptures of saints and 14 reliefs in elaborate cartouches. At the uppermost stage are saints connected with Jesus’ earth life – his mother’s parents St. Anne and St. Joachim, his foster-father St. Joseph, and St. John the Baptist, who was preparing his coming – who are accompanied by St. Lawrence and St. Jerome, saints to whom the chapel in the Olomouc town hall was dedicated. Three reliefs represent the Three theological virtues Faith, Hope, and Love.

Below them, the second stage is dedicated to Moravian saints St. Cyril and St. Methodius, who came to Great Moravia to spread Christianity in 863, St. Blaise, in whose name one of the main Olomouc churches is consecrated, and patrons of neighbouring Bohemia St. Adalbert of Prague and St. John of Nepomuk, whose following was very strong there as well.

In the lowest stage one can see the figures of an Austrian patron St. Maurice and a Bohemian patron St. Wenceslas, in whose names two important Olomouc churches were consecrated, another Austrian patron St. Florian, who was also viewed as a protector against various disasters, especially fire, St. John of Capistrano, who used to preach in Olomouc, St. Anthony of Padua, a member of the Franciscan Order, which owned an important monastery in Olomouc, and St. Aloysius Gonzaga, a patron of students. His sculpture showed that Olomouc was very proud of its university. Reliefs of all twelve apostles are placed among these sculptures.

The column also houses a small chapel inside with reliefs depicting Cain's offering from his crop, Abel's offering of firstlings of his flock, Noah's first burnt offering after the Flood, Abraham's offering of Isaac and of a lamb, and Jesus' death. The cities of Jerusalem and Olomouc can be seen in the background of the last mentioned relief.