Treptow Soviet Memorial

Berlin, Germany

Three great Soviet memorials were erected in Berlin after the war, which not only serve as memorials, but also as war cemeteries. The facility in the Treptower Park is the central memorial and with 100,000 square metres the largest of its kind in Germany. The facility, also serving as cemetery for 5,000 Soviet solders, was built between 1946 and 1948 on the site of a large playing and sports field. Memorial slabs and frescos depicting the course of the war are arranged in long tiers of straight lines. The imposing figure on top of the mausoleum shows a soldier carrying a rescued German child. It is a memorial for the app. 80,000 Red Army soldiers killed during the conquest of Berlin in World War II. 40,000 cubic metres of granite were used in the construction. Aside from the war cemetery in Niederschönhausen, the facility is the largest Soviet war cemetery in Germany as well as the largest anti-fascist memorial in Western Europe.

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Details

Founded: 1946-1948
Category: Statues in Germany
Historical period: Cold War and Separation (Germany)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Migue Ahedo (20 months ago)
Amazing. Definitely a place to visit to understand history. Mystic. A jewel.
Jo Lee (21 months ago)
needs to be respected an kept in mind that russians died to deny occupation by gernans. also you might have a look behind the front: a silent garden to stay
jeremy bouchat (2 years ago)
Very impressive site. It was freezing in December when I went. Nothing much in English but glad I went to see this.
Angela Joya (2 years ago)
This is such an important piece of history that not only reminds about us all about solidarity but also of sacrifice of one people for another group. It is also important to remember that while Hollywood gives all credit to America for the defeat of fascism, it was the Russians who actually lost millions in fighting fascism. #Respect
Kyle Campbell (2 years ago)
Interesting. Probably a good idea to read up on the rapacious, cruel history of the Russian Red Army's advance into Berlin before going here. That will help you find it ironic as well as moving, and also understand how nations even to this day frame their version of history for specific purposes. The guards were modeled after a grandfather and grandson who took part in the advance and occupation. The monument is a tapestry of truth and falsehoods. Reminds me of modern politics.
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