Šomoška Castle is unique among the Slovak castles as it is built of unconventional hexagonal basalt pillars. It was probably built in the later half of the 13th century after the Tartar invasion. After suppression of the Rákoczis rebellion, the Emperor had pulled down several castles, but Šomoška was spared. However, it gradually decayed and the last tower burnt in 1826 when a lighting struck it. In 1972 extensive conservation and partial reconstruction saved the castle before its total destruction.

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Founded: 1291
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovakia

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrej Orogvani (3 years ago)
Nice forest walk and stunning views from the top of the castle
Peregrino Perdido (4 years ago)
Absolutely perfect. Not just the castle but also the surrounding nature and the path to the castle. I love this place. Word of advice - come in autumn...
김보경 (4 years ago)
It is really beautiful and calm :) enjoyed watching the swallows♥️and the view to the trees changing their colours is amazing.
Timotej Torok (4 years ago)
Very nice historic place. Apart for other reasons it is also known for natural "rockfall".
Rastic Idaho (4 years ago)
Average view, just the surrounding woods and one hungarian village. The castle itself is just a bit of a courtyard and an empty tower. There are basalt formations in the area, which are absolutely marvelous, so be sure to check your navigation.
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