Château de Brou was built in the second half of the 17th century by Paul-Esprit Feydeau, the Royal intendant. Important changes were made in the 18th century including the removal of a monumental staircase in the hall to allow to give more room to the bedrooms on the 1st floor. Instead, two staircases were built on the north side at each corner of the two wings of the castle. The dovecote is probably the oldest building on the property. Built in 1545, it stands on a circular basement with a central pillar. In 1844 the estate was sold due the Feydeau family had no descendants. It was acquired by Charles-Floréal Thiébaut. Since then, Château de Brou has remained in the possession of the same family.

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Founded: 17th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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www.chateaudebrou.fr

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Dominique Guyot (2 years ago)
Jusqu en 1976 j àchetais du lait de vaches de leur ferme. Cela durai depuis longtemps. Les habitants des cités pendant la guerre s y approvisionnaient
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