Charlottenhof Palace

Potsdam, Germany

Charlottenhof Palace is located southwest of Sanssouci Palace. It is most famous as the summer residence of Crown Prince Frederick William (later King Frederick William IV of Prussia). Officially the palace and park were named Charlottenhof in honor of Maria Charlotte von Gentzkow who had owned the property from 1790 to 1794.

The park area with its various buildings can be traced back to the 18th century. After it had changed hands several times, King Frederick William III of Prussia bought the land that borders the south of Sanssouci Park and gave it to his son Frederick William and his wife Elisabeth Ludovika for Christmas in 1825.

The Crown Prince charged the architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel with the remodeling of an already existing farm house and the project was completed at low cost from 1826 through 1829. In the end, Schinkel, with the help of his student Ludwig Persius, built a small neo-classical palace on the foundations of the old farm house in the image of the old Roman villas.

The interior design of the ten rooms is still largely intact. The furniture, for the most part designed by Schinkel himself, is remarkable for its simple and cultivated style.

The palace's most distinctive room is the tent room fashioned after a Roman Caesar's tent. In the tent room both ceiling and walls are decorated with blue and white striped wallpaper and the window treatments and bed tent and coverings continue that design. The room was used as a bedroom for companions and guests. The blue and white theme is continued throughout on the palace's window shutters, it seems, in deference to the Bavarian heritage of then crown princess Elisabeth.

The landscape architect Peter Joseph Lenné was charged with the design of the Charlottenhof gardens.He completely recreated the originally flat and partly marshy area into an English garden with trees, lawn and water features. He also linked the new park at Charlottenhof to the older one at Sanssouci from the time of Frederick the Great.

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Details

Founded: 1826-1829
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mariano Gustavo Morelli (2 years ago)
Nice but not the best
Ritabata (2 years ago)
We went there in late Nov and everywhere is under maintenance, so if want to take beautiful photos I will suggest to come in other months.
Eugene Pougatch (2 years ago)
A small summer palace with modest interior. Honestly don't waste your money for the tour, it's not that impressive. Quite beautiful outside though.
Laura Zeta (2 years ago)
Cute inside, but the guided tour are only offered in German. For non-germane speakers only a printed panflet is given, and you are forced to follow the guide listening speaking in German instead of going at your own pace.
swapnil patil (2 years ago)
Charlottenhof palace is part of many palaces and gardens present in park sanssousi. It's a small palace with some fountains and lake in front. Public transport available right outside the palace gate.
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