Cecilienhof Palace

Potsdam, Germany

Cecilienhof Palace was built from 1914 to 1917. Emperor Wilhelm II ordered the establishment of a fund for constructing this new palace at Potsdam for his oldest son, Crown Prince Wilhelm (William) and his wife, Duchess Cecilie of Mecklenburg-Schwerin on 19 December 1912. Cecilienhof was the last palace built by the House of Hohenzollern that ruled the Kingdom of Prussia and the German Empire until the end of World War I. It is famous for having been the location of the Potsdam Conference in 1945, in which the leaders of the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom and the United States took important decisions affecting the shape of post World War II Europe and Asia. Cecilienhof has been part of the Palaces and Parks of Potsdam and Berlin UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1990.

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Details

Founded: 1914-1917
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joe Crook (3 years ago)
It was incredible to visit somewhere that hosted a conference that shaped the future of Europe in the 20th century!
Jørn Nielsen (3 years ago)
A very historic place you have to visit if you are in the area.It is looking extra nice in the summer period.The building itself and the park around it is also very nice
Sujeeth Kumar Aekbote (3 years ago)
Historic. This is the only word that can describe the place. Took the guided tour and it was very informative. The staff were helpful and courteous too. Worth a tour.
Richard Carter (4 years ago)
Only toured Schloss Cecilienhof from the outside. Didn't go inside. Beautiful, what you would call a "Tudor" style building. Very interesting. Now a private hotel.
Melvin Diaz (4 years ago)
Another historical castle in Potsdam where great leaders met to decide the future of Germany after the war. There is a five point cross made with flowers that looks best in the spring and summer. Located in the woods, this palace has a tranquil atmosphere. Admission to the area is free. Bring comfortable shoes to walk around. An hour might be enough yo grasp an idea of the place.
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