Glienicke Palace

Wannsee, Germany

Glienicke Palace was designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel for Prince Carl of Prussia in 1826, The building, originally merely a cottage, was turned into a summer palace in the late classical style. Particularly striking are two golden lion statues in front of the frontage, which were also designed by Schinkel. The lions are versions of the Medici lions from the Villa Medici. In the palace are antique objets d'art, which the Prince brought back from his trips. The palace's park is now called the Volkspark Glienicke. The palace and park are UNESCO World Heritage sites as part of the Palaces and Parks of Potsdam and Berlin since 1990.

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Details

Founded: 1826
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

MarimoUno (2 years ago)
Interesting history. A very small castle with impressive garden and pleasure ground.
GEOS ENGINEERING AND CONSULTING GMBH (2 years ago)
Tour was very good, but to call this luxury villa, A Castle, I feel exaggerated
M C (2 years ago)
One weird thing about the park is keeping dogs on a short leash. Why? It's a park. It's not like it was a museum. Otherwise, I quite like it there. Beautiful fountains, nice lake view. Always pretty and shady.
Fernando Jiménez Guzmán (2 years ago)
Wonderful place to have a walking and go further into the woods and then have some nice drink, a calm and beautigul landscapes...
Joshua Chamber (2 years ago)
One of the best historical places I guess all over Berlin.
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