Hufeisensiedlung

Berlin, Germany

The Hufeisensiedlung is a housing estate in Berlin, built in 1925-33. It enjoys international renown as a milestone of modern urban housing. It was designed by architect Bruno Taut, municipal planning head and co-architect Martin Wagner, garden architect Leberecht Migge and Neukölln gardens director Ottokar Wagler. In 1986 the ensemble was placed under German heritage protection. On July 7, 2008, it was awarded UNESCO World Heritage status as one out of six Berlin Modernism Housing Estates. Since 2010, the Horseshoe Estate has also been listed as a garden monument. The Hufeisensiedlung is probably the most outstanding example of innovative German town planning during the 1920s.

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Details

Founded: 1925-1933
Category:
Historical period: Weimar Republic (Germany)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Steve Schlothauer (18 months ago)
Ein wundervolles sehr familiäres Restaurant. Sehr leckere Gerichte zu sehr fairen Preisen. Unbedingt empfehlenswert zu jedem Anlass. !!! Fünf Sterne !!!
Laurence B (3 years ago)
One of the architectural highlight for urban housing in Berlin. To visit if you are into architecture
Tintin de Serbie (3 years ago)
Wonderful modernistic architecture!
Khaled Abdalla (4 years ago)
A wonderful view
Valeria Stanga (4 years ago)
Interesting place with historical significance. Well-maintained and clean.
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