Church of Peace

Potsdam, Germany

The Protestant Church of Peace (Friedenskirche) is situated in the palace grounds of Sanssouci Park in Potsdam. The church was built according to the wishes and with the close involvement of the artistically gifted King Frederick William IV and designed by the court architect, Ludwig Persius. After Persius' death in 1845, the architect Friedrich August Stüler was charged with continuing his work. Building included work by Ferdinand von Arnim and Ludwig Ferdinand Hesse also. The church is located in the area covered by the UNESCO World Heritage Site Palaces and Parks of Potsdam and Berlin.

The cornerstone of the churchhouse was laid on April 14, 1845. The building was dedicated on September 24, 1848, though construction continued until 1854. The structure resembles a High Medieval Italian monastery. The Kaiser Friedrich Mausoleum was added to the north side between 1888 and 1890. The plans were drawn up by Julius Carl Raschdorff, who also designed the Berlin Cathedral from 1893 to 1905, in the style of the Baroque-influenced Italian High Renaissance. The 17th century Chapel of the Holy Tomb in Innichen, South Tyrol, Italy, serves as an archetype for the Mausoleum, which in turn was based on the chapel on Jerusalem's Calvary Hill. The mausoleum is a domed structure with an oval outline and an attached rectangular altar room. The inside contains a surrounding gallery and the domed roof, supported by two black columns, one on top of the other, which run around the edge. A golden mosaic on the inside of the roof shows alternating angels and palm trees.

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Details

Founded: 1845
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aaron Smith (2 years ago)
I love this place! My fiancé and I are getting married at this church and we could not imagine doing that elsewhere. The Church of Peace (Friedenskirche) is one of the well-known Potsdamer Churches that resides within the beautiful, royal Park Sanssouci Soucci. The architecture and intention behind the church of peace is familiar, yet powerfully distinct. One of my favorite places to visit in the park is the Jesus statue right in front of the entrance of the church. It's simply breathtaking! If you are visiting Potsdam, I highly recommend the Church of Peace!
Beddy Frointlich (2 years ago)
nice place to take a park break in Sancoussi
Irene Boychuk (3 years ago)
This place has a good spirit, and you can feel it
Milan Gruner (3 years ago)
Nice atmosphere, lots of water and flowers around. Good place to chill
Charles Seaton Jr. (3 years ago)
This was the 1st site we saw as we entered the Gates of the Sanssouci Palace and Park. This church was under a sight remodeling when we visited, but overall it was a beautiful place to see.
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