Church of Peace

Potsdam, Germany

The Protestant Church of Peace (Friedenskirche) is situated in the palace grounds of Sanssouci Park in Potsdam. The church was built according to the wishes and with the close involvement of the artistically gifted King Frederick William IV and designed by the court architect, Ludwig Persius. After Persius' death in 1845, the architect Friedrich August Stüler was charged with continuing his work. Building included work by Ferdinand von Arnim and Ludwig Ferdinand Hesse also. The church is located in the area covered by the UNESCO World Heritage Site Palaces and Parks of Potsdam and Berlin.

The cornerstone of the churchhouse was laid on April 14, 1845. The building was dedicated on September 24, 1848, though construction continued until 1854. The structure resembles a High Medieval Italian monastery. The Kaiser Friedrich Mausoleum was added to the north side between 1888 and 1890. The plans were drawn up by Julius Carl Raschdorff, who also designed the Berlin Cathedral from 1893 to 1905, in the style of the Baroque-influenced Italian High Renaissance. The 17th century Chapel of the Holy Tomb in Innichen, South Tyrol, Italy, serves as an archetype for the Mausoleum, which in turn was based on the chapel on Jerusalem's Calvary Hill. The mausoleum is a domed structure with an oval outline and an attached rectangular altar room. The inside contains a surrounding gallery and the domed roof, supported by two black columns, one on top of the other, which run around the edge. A golden mosaic on the inside of the roof shows alternating angels and palm trees.

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Details

Founded: 1845
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marcus Hurley (12 months ago)
This is a very photogenic church, set next to a lake for maximum effect. I couldn't see any English information so I'm not sure of the history but it was lovely and peaceful to walk around although it was obviously a relatively modern (19th century?) building. Free to enter and set in lovely parkland.
Zwei Stein (13 months ago)
It was very peasculf with a nice inner garden and two small fountains. Unfortunately we didn't go inside.
Amit Raj (13 months ago)
The place is very peaceful and when you visit you realise why it's call the church of peace!! It's so calm with the nature and a pond. Must visit and just sit near it and relax.
Javi Alonso (14 months ago)
You really feel the peace in this corner of the Sanssouci Park. Don't miss it
Mosti Ghu (2 years ago)
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