Pfingstberg Belvedere

Potsdam, Germany

The Belvedere on the Pfingstberg is a palace in the northern part of the New Garden in Potsdam, atop Pfingstberg mountain. It was commissioned by Friedrich Wilhelm IV and is only one part of an originally substantially more extensive building project. The twin-towered building was modeled on of Italian Renaissance architecture, and it was built between 1847 and 1863 with an interruption from 1852 to 1860. From sketches of from the king, the architects Ludwig Persius, Friedrich August Stüler and Ludwig Ferdinand Hessian drew up details plans. The garden architect Peter Joseph Lenné was responsible for the design of the grounds.

The building fell into disrepair, but was repaired between 1988 and 2005 by a group of local residents. Today, the Belvedere is open for tourists.

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Address

Vogelweide, Potsdam, Germany
See all sites in Potsdam

Details

Founded: 1847-1863
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gisele Muse Vlogs (14 months ago)
It is has a very serene view and sorrounded by so much greenery. Worth visiting.
santa86 (2 years ago)
Beautiful place. I suggest visit it at sundown.
santa86 (2 years ago)
Beautiful place. I suggest visit it at sundown.
Karen O. (2 years ago)
The Belvedere on the Pfingstberg is at the top of Pfingstberg hill. It was commissioned by King Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia and built between 1847 and 1863 as a viewing platform. It is absolutely goooorgeous! I was pretty tired after walking all over the New Garden but it is DEFINITELY worth the visit.
Karen O. (2 years ago)
The Belvedere on the Pfingstberg is at the top of Pfingstberg hill. It was commissioned by King Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia and built between 1847 and 1863 as a viewing platform. It is absolutely goooorgeous! I was pretty tired after walking all over the New Garden but it is DEFINITELY worth the visit.
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