The Jewish Museum Berlin is one of the largest Jewish Museums in Europe. In three buildings, two of which are new additions specifically built for the museum by architect Daniel Libeskind, two millennia of German-Jewish history are on display in the permanent exhibition as well as in various changing exhibitions. German-Jewish history is documented in the collections, the library and the archive, in the computer terminals at the museum's Rafael Roth Learning Center, and is reflected in the museum's program of events. The museum was opened in 2001 and is one of Berlin’s most popular museums.

Opposite the building ensemble, the Academy of the Jewish Museum Berlin was built – also after a design by Libeskind – in 2011/2012 in the former flower market hall. The archives, library, museum education department, and a lecture hall can all be found in the academy.

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Founded: 2001
Category: Museums in Germany

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fiona Amos (20 months ago)
Interesting and sobering visit. Well worth visiting and certainly prompted some interesting discussions. Leave yourself at least 2 hours to take everything in. On a practical note your bags and coats have to be left in a cloakroom. We were caught out by this so had to carry purse and passports in hand throughout visit.
Richard Hodkinson (20 months ago)
Good general Jewish culture museum. Some striking and well designed architectural parts and cultural lessons and experiences. Recommended, especially if you've never been to a Jewish or holocaust museum, camp or seen a movie. Yet this is a much broader cultural museum and benefits nicely from that.
Nicole Chiha (20 months ago)
Highly highly recommend this place. To anyone interested in history. There are a few surprise elements that you don’t expect when you go. It’s something to just experience for yourself. The architecture is of an extremely high standard. Please go!! Also get the audio guides.
K. Nakanishi (21 months ago)
Was it worth traveling halfway around the world to experience this museum? Without hesitation: yes. You just have to come and see and immerse yourself in the dark history of this city. It is so important that people understand how and why the holocaust came to be, that I think everyone in the world should be required to make the journey. Emotional, enlightening, tragic, but ultimately hopeful.
Levi Waldron (2 years ago)
You have to really understand the workings of the architect's mind to get a lot out of this museum. It's all about creating unusual spaces, with few exhibits. The buildings look large from outside but are small on the inside. Would probably be better with a guided tour, and when the upper floors of the old building weren't closed. I found the room with 10000 steel faces made the greatest impression. The gardens are great.
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