Mosonmagyaróvár Castle

Mosonmagyaróvár, Hungary

King Stephen ordered the building of a castle at Moson to defend the border in the early 11th century. Settlers flocked around the wooden and then stone castle, and by the 11th century it was described as a strong fortress and bustling merchant town. However, in 1030, the Holy Roman Emperor Conrad II was able to conquer the castle on his way to the Rába. During the Crusades, Kálmán, King of Győr and Moson, was able to defeat a Swabian-Bavarian army of 15,000 men from the castle. The next disaster occured in 1271, when Ottokar II, a Czech king, leveled the castle.

Béla IV, King of Hungary at the time, did not consider it worthwhile to try and rebuild the castle at Moson. After the fall of Győr to the Ottoman army in 1594, the castle was modernized to withstand a possible future attack by Italian engineers.

In 1683, the new castle was helpless against the retreating Turkish army, which had been repulsed again at Vienna. Both Moson and Magyaróvár were set ablaze. Though the town archives were now completely destroyed, the damage was repaired more quickly this time around, at least quickly enough to allow Rákóczi to use the castle as a base during his war for independence from the Habsburgs. In 1721, after the revolution was crushed, the castle at Magyaróvár lost its strategic importance, and all military materiel was transferred to Bratislava.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Hungary

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Patrícia Procházková (15 months ago)
Nice :-)
Jan Koncsol (2 years ago)
Fantastic and scenic location. Great for photos! Recommended!
Jorge Clementez (2 years ago)
Not big but tiny castle, being repared.. in 2019
Marc Werle (2 years ago)
Construction work ongoing, difficult to get a good impression.
István Vígh (2 years ago)
Super
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Frösö Runestone

Frösöstenen is the northern-most raised runestone in the world and Jämtland's only runestone. It originally stood at the tip of ferry terminal on the sound between the island of Frösön and Östersund. The stone dates to between 1030 and 1050. It has now been relocated to the lawn in front of the local county seat due to the construction of a new bridge, between 1969 and 1971, on the original site.

Frösö runestone inscription means: Austmaðr, Guðfastr's son, had this stone raised and this bridge built and Christianized Jämtland. Ásbjörn built the bridge. Trjónn and Steinn carved these runes.