Palaces, manors and town halls in Hungary

Hungarian Parliament Building

The Hungarian Parliament Building is the seat of the National Assembly of Hungary, one of Europe"s oldest legislative buildings, a notable landmark of Hungary and a popular tourist destination of Budapest. It is currently the largest building in Hungary and still the highest building in Budapest. Budapest was united from three cities in 1873 and seven years later the Diet resolved to establish a new, representative ...
Founded: 1885-1904 | Location: Budapest, Hungary

Hungarian State Opera House

The Budapest opera house is a beautiful Neo-Renaissance building opened in 1884. Construction included the use of marble and frescos by some of the best artisans of that era. Designed by Miklós Ybl, one of Europe's leading architects in the mid to late 19th century, the Budapest Opera House quickly became one of the most prestigious musical institutions in Europe. Many important artists performed here, including Gustav M ...
Founded: 1884 | Location: Budapest, Hungary

Bishop’s Palace

King St. Stephen established a bishopric of Pécs in 1009. The origins of the Bishop"s Palace reach back to the 12th century. First it was inhabited by the French Bishop Bonipert and later on by the Hungarian Bishop Mor. Just like the cathedral, the palace is a piece of stylistic history. The Gothic windows and Roman layout are hidden by the Neo-Renaissance facade. Preserved in the smokery is the wooden tobacco ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Pécs, Hungary

Eszterháza Palace

Esterháza is a palace built by Prince Nikolaus Esterházy. Sometimes called the 'Hungarian Versailles', it is Hungary's grandest Rococo edifice. Esterházy began his plans for a new palace not long after he became reigning prince in 1762 on the death of his brother Paul Anton. Before this time, Nikolaus was accustomed to spending much of his time at a hunting lodge called Süttör, built in the same location around 1720 ...
Founded: 1766 | Location: Fertőd, Hungary

Bishop's Palace

The Bishop"s Palace in Vác is a historic building, built between 1768 and 1775. The garden of the palace is a preserved botanical garden of national importance. The side-wing on the side of the garden overlooks Konstantin Square, while its main entrance opens from Migazzi Square.
Founded: 1768-1755 | Location: Vác, Hungary

Gödöllo Palace

The Royal Palace of Gödöllő is one of the most important, largest monuments of Hungarian palace architecture. Its builder, Count Antal Grassalkovich I (1694–1771) was a typical figure of the regrouping Hungarian aristocracy of the 18th century. He was a Royal Septemvir, president of the Hungarian Chamber, and confidant of Empress Maria Theresa (1740–1780). The construction began around 1733, under the direction of ...
Founded: 1733 | Location: Gödöllő, Hungary

Festetics Palace

The Festetics Family is one of the most significant ducal families in Hungary. The family, who was of Croatian origin, moved to Hungary in the 17th century. In 1739 Christopher Festetics (1696-1768) bought the Keszthely estate and its appurtenances, and chose it to be the centre of his estates. He began the construction of the Festetics Palacein 1745. The two-storey, U-shaped, 34-room Baroque palace was rebuilt several ti ...
Founded: 1745 | Location: Keszthely, Hungary

L'Huillier-Coburg Palace

The L"Huillier-Coburg Palace in Edelény is the seventh largest palace in Hungary. This prominent example of early-baroque architecture was built between 1716 and 1730 by Jean-Francois L"Huillier who originated from France, Alsace-Lorraine. In 1727 L"Huillier became full owner of the palace with the king"s consent. The construction of the palace needed a well-organized logistics as the woods wer ...
Founded: 1716-1730 | Location: Edelényi, Hungary

Andrássy Palace

Hungarian aristocratic family, Andrassy, has been known for its lavish lifestyle. The Andrassy Palace was built in the second half of the 19th century. With multiple towers, and neo-gothic, romantic style, it resembles the French castles in the valley of the Loire. Behind the building, a well-kept English park pleases the eye, hosting concerts during the first half of August annually. The musical series are named Piano Ce ...
Founded: 19th century | Location: Tiszadob, Hungary

Fehérvárcsurgó Palace

Set in a 50-acre English-style park, the Károlyi Mansion in Fehérvárcsurgó was built in 1844. The Neo-Classicist style mansion offers 20 rooms, furnished with historic décor. There is a summer terrace and an onsite restaurant that serves Hungarian and French cuisine.
Founded: 1844 | Location: Fehérvárcsurgó, Hungary

Széchényi Palace

The mid-18th century palace in Nagycenk honours the memory of the Széchényi family. The collections of Ferenc Széchényi are the foundations of the National Széchényi Library and the Hungarian National Museum. The mausoleum of the family is in Nagycenk; István Széchenyi, 'the greatest Hungarian' lived here for a long time and is buried here.
Founded: 1750 | Location: Nagycenk, Hungary

Savoy Castle

The Savoy Castle is an 18th-century Baroque style palace. Construction of the spacious home was begun in 1702 at the commissioning of Prince Eugene of Savoy and finished in approximately 1722. Prince Eugene of Savoy acquired Csepel Island in 1698, and thereafter began the planning process of this 'maison de plaisance'. Eugene commissioned Johann Lucas von Hildebrandt, a student of the Roman Carlo Fontana, to de ...
Founded: 1702-1722 | Location: Ráckeve, Hungary

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Cesis Castle

German crusaders known as the Livonian Brothers of the Sword began construction of the Cēsis castle (Wenden) near the hill fort in 1209. When the castle was enlarged and fortified, it served as the residence for the Order's Master from 1237 till 1561, with periodic interruptions. Its ruins are some of the most majestic castle ruins in the Baltic states. Once the most important castle of the Livonian Order, it was the official residence for the masters of the order.

In 1577, during the Livonian War, the garrison destroyed the castle to prevent it from falling into the control of Ivan the Terrible, who was decisively defeated in the Battle of Wenden (1578).

In 1598 it was incorporated into the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and Wenden Voivodship was created here. In 1620 Wenden was conquered by Sweden. It was rebuilt afterwards, but was destroyed again in 1703 during the Great Northern War by the Russian army and left in a ruined state. Already from the end of the 16th century, the premises of the Order's castle were adjusted to the requirements of the Cēsis Castle estate. When in 1777 the Cēsis Castle estate was obtained by Count Carl Sievers, he had his new residence house built on the site of the eastern block of the castle, joining its end wall with the fortification tower.

Since 1949, the Cēsis History Museum has been located in this New Castle of the Cēsis Castle estate. The front yard of the New Castle is enclosed by a granary and a stable-coach house, which now houses the Exhibition Hall of the Museum. Beside the granary there is the oldest brewery in Latvia, Cēsu alus darītava, which was built in 1878 during the later Count Sievers' time, but its origins date back to the period of the Livonian Order. Further on, the Cēsis Castle park is situated, which was laid out in 1812. The park has the romantic characteristic of that time, with its winding footpaths, exotic plants, and the waters of the pond reflecting the castle's ruins. Nowadays also one of the towers is open for tourists.