Ludwigslust Palace

Ludwigslust, Germany

Ludwigslust Palace had its origins in a simple hunting lodge within a day's ride of the ducal capital, Schwerin. In 1724 Prince Christian Ludwig, the son of the Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, decided to build a hunting lodge on this site, near a hamlet called Klenow. Even after he became duke in his turn in 1747, he passed most of his time at this residence, which he called Ludwigslust ('Ludwig's joy').

In 1765, Duke Friederich made Ludwigslust the capital of the duchy instead of Schwerin. Consequently the little town that had already grown in the service of the schloss, was further expanded, and a cornerstone for a new, grander residenz was laid directly behind the old hunting box in 1768. In the years 1772-1776 Ludwigslust was rebuilt to late Baroque plans by Johann Joachim Busch. The structure is brick, clad in the local sandstone; forty over-lifesize allegorical figures, also in sandstone, by Rudolf Kaplunger, alternating with vases, crown the low attic above the cornice.

The interiors of Ludwigslust are more fully neoclassical. The grand reception rooms are on the piano nobile, or Festetage ('Reception floor'), above a low ground floor that contained guestrooms. The Goldener Saal ('Gilded Hall') in the central block rises through two storeys, with a colossal order of Corinthian columns and massive decorations carried out in stucco and the innovative moldable and modelable paper-maché called Ludwigsluster Carton; it is used today for summertime concerts. One flanking range was semi-public, with a sequence of antechamber, salon and audience chamber, and a gallery. The opposite range was semi-private, with the Duke's drawing-room and bedchamber (hung with framed miniatures), a cabinet and a gallery with a porcelain chimneypiece.

The palace's surrounding Schlosspark of 120 ha. was laid out with formal canals, fountains and a frankly artificial cascade, tamed of all the wildness that a later, Romantic generation would venerate; it was built according to sketches by the French architect Jean-Laurent Le Geay, who had laid out the formal garden at Schwerin in 1749-55, but was quickly overtaken at Ludwigslust by his assistant, Johann Joachim Busch, who began the work in 1763. The trees laid out in the pattern and at the scale of Bernini's colonnades in Piazza San Pietro have disappeared, but there are the neoclassical stone bridge designed by Busch about 1780, with a cascade that falls across a lip so perfectly regular that it has the name Der Waltze (the 'Roll'), a grotto built as a ruin, a Gothic chapel, two mausoleums and a monument to a favourite horse.

In 1837 Grand Duke Paul Friedrich returned Schwerin to its capital status. As a summer residence, Schloss Ludwigslust was preserved from further alterations. In the mid-nineteenth century much of the park was re-landscaped in the more naturalistic English landscape garden manner, under the direction of a garden designer with an extensive clientele among the German aristocracy, Peter Joseph Lenné. Water near the schloss was recast in more naturalistic manner and the surrounding woodland edges were varied, with clumps of trees as outliers, but the main axia Hofdamenallee centered on the palace, still stretches dead straight through the woods, and the narrow Great Canal, laid out at an angle to one side, still extends a kilometer and a half.

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Details

Founded: 1768-1776
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Emerging States (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maria Teenwolf (2 years ago)
This place is really awesome. It's very beautiful and has a huge garden. And it's always open for everyone. In summer there is a festival with comedians and huge fireworks at the end of this day.
Hanum Amahoru (2 years ago)
Perfect place to spend your retirement. Thee neighborhood are pretty and quiet and clean and very organised. The schloss garden is huge, just like the one in the period dramas. I really like the atmosphere.
Sebastian Märker (2 years ago)
Beautiful place to visit, especially in spring or during the summer periode. This place is famous for it's amazing palace garden and sculptures made of papermarche!!!! Love it.
Mirko Plitt (3 years ago)
Beautiful gardens, impressively but only partially restored chateau. As usual in Germany, a little lack of understanding of the esthetics of historical sites -- cars and even trucks parked just in front of the building
Sergii Pavlenko (3 years ago)
The castle is not as interesting as the castle at Schwerin but even so it well worth visiting. Beautiful gardens and park behind the castle. Nice fountain and pond with ducks to feed. You can wander around for hours and there are a few things to see. Great place to relax before taking on the road the next day.
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