Rehna Abbey is a former Benedictine (the 13th century) and Premonstratensian nunnery (until 1552). It was founded between 1230 and 1236. In 1254 the monastery was inaugurated and this year also began the construction of the cloister between church and convent. In the 14th and 15th centuries, the monastery was one of the most important monasteries Mecklenburg. Numerous Lübeck families had their daughters educated there and funded the monastery with donations.

During the Reformation the monastery was dissolved in 1552. From 1576 to the early 18th century it belonged to Duke widows and princesses Anna Sophia of Prussia (until 1591), Sophia of Schleswig-Holstein-Gottorp (to 1634), Anna Sophie (until 1648) and Juliane Sibylla (to 1761). At the beginning of the 18th century, the remaining buildings were used as offices until 1819. After the Second World War, the abbey was used as a school until 1995.

The late Romanesque brick church have survived from the original monastery, however it was radically altered in the mid-15th century.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Freiheitsplatz 2, Rehna, Germany
See all sites in Rehna

Details

Founded: 1230-1254
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

User Reviews

Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kerameikos

Kerameikos was the potters" quarter of the city, from which the English word 'ceramic' is derived, and was also the site of an important cemetery and numerous funerary sculptures erected along the road out of the city towards Eleusis.

The earliest tombs at the Kerameikos date from the Early Bronze Age (2700-2000 BC), and the cemetery appears to have continuously expanded from the sub-Mycenaean period (1100-1000 BC). In the Geometric (1000-700 BC) and Archaic periods (700-480 BC) the number of tombs increased; they were arranged inside tumuli or marked by funerary monuments. The cemetery was used incessantly from the Hellenistic period until the Early Christian period (338 BC until approximately the sixth century AD).

The most important Athenian vases come from the tombs of the Kerameikos. Among them is the famous “Dipylon Oinochoe”, which bears the earliest inscription written in the Greek alphabet (second half of the eighth century BC). The site"s small museum houses the finds from the Kerameikos excavations.