The House of Soviets is the office building built in Stalinist style in the late 1930s. According to Soviet projects, the House of Soviets was planned to host the administration of Soviet Leningrad government. The location was chosen on undeveloped south outskirts of the city away from the downtown area which was prone to frequent floods. The construction was completed just before the Nazi invasion of Soviet Union at the beginning of World War II, and the building was never used for the intended purpose. In 1941, it was fortified and used as a local command post for Soviet Red Army during the Siege of Leningrad. Surviving reminders of that stronghold are small bunkers built from a reinforced concrete which still stand at several corners of the House of Soviets. Later, the building housed the Soviet research institute which focused on the design of electronic components for military objects. Among the notable engineers who worked there are two post-World War II defectors from the US, Alfred Sarant and Joel Barr. Currently, the office space in the building is rented out to various businesses.

A square in front of the House of Soviets is called Moscow Square (Moskovskaya Ploshad). During a construction of the subway station Moskovskaya in 1970, the square was remodelled and upgraded with a massive monument to Vladimir Lenin designed by Mikhail Anikushin. In 2006, several fountain features were added at the square.

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Founded: 1936
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Russia

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Юлия Догадкина (7 months ago)
Летом здесь красиво,работают фонтаны,много народу.Само здание- исторический памятник. В правом крыле находится Петербургская недвижимость.
Елена Федорова (7 months ago)
Старое пятиэтажное здание со средним ремонтом .Есть лифт. Внутри здания охрана .Чтобы подняться на лифте на верх необходиио предьявить паспорт или водительские права,и тогда дают электронный пропуск который на выходе сдаешь .В здании много офисов.Есть указатели на этажах с табличками что очень удобно с ориентироваться в каком направлении идти. Соответственно каждый офис пронумерован.
Анастасия Гончарова (9 months ago)
Монументальное здание советских времён. Удобное расположение в 5 минутах ходьбы от метро Московская. Чисто, аккуратно. Уютный зал для йоги :) Строгие ,но вежливые охранники
Nguyen Tri Thanh (11 months ago)
Such a big station
Diego Fabian Pajarito Grajales (2 years ago)
It's amazing to be in front of this huge building, astonishing size and lots of friends from Stalin's era
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