Torun Castle Ruins

Toruñ, Poland

In spring 1231 Teutonic Knights crossed river Vistula at the height of Nessau and established a fortress. On 28 December 1233, the Teutonic Knights Hermann von Salza and Hermann Balk signed the foundation charters for Thorn and Che³mno. The original document was lost in 1244. The set of rights in general is known as Kulm law. In 1236, due to frequent flooding, it was relocated to the present site of the Old Town.

Torun castle was destroyed in 1454 during the Toruñ"s burgher uprising against the Teutonic Knights what in succession caused the 13-years Polish-Teutonic War ended by signing famous Second Toruñ Treaty in 1466. It was only 1966 when the ruins was explored and prepared for tourists.

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Address

Przedzamcze 3, Toruñ, Poland
See all sites in Toruñ

Details

Founded: 1231
Category: Ruins in Poland

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Minna Pohjola (7 months ago)
Nice castle ruins and we have local quide with us, worth a visit!
İsmail Ç (8 months ago)
İts good to see place but not go night because dungeuon off and wiev bad.
Cristina Vasilița (12 months ago)
Well preserved, the castle itself looks really nice, but the exhibitions aren't that authentic :( although I did enjoy my time there, a good attraction for kids
Marcin Senderek (12 months ago)
One the amazing sites in Torun
Emilian Kavalski (16 months ago)
The beautiful and melancholic ruins of the medieval castle built in Torun by the Tutonic Knights
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