Torun Castle Ruins

Toruñ, Poland

In spring 1231 Teutonic Knights crossed river Vistula at the height of Nessau and established a fortress. On 28 December 1233, the Teutonic Knights Hermann von Salza and Hermann Balk signed the foundation charters for Thorn and Che³mno. The original document was lost in 1244. The set of rights in general is known as Kulm law. In 1236, due to frequent flooding, it was relocated to the present site of the Old Town.

Torun castle was destroyed in 1454 during the Toruñ"s burgher uprising against the Teutonic Knights what in succession caused the 13-years Polish-Teutonic War ended by signing famous Second Toruñ Treaty in 1466. It was only 1966 when the ruins was explored and prepared for tourists.

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Przedzamcze 3, Toruñ, Poland
See all sites in Toruñ

Details

Founded: 1231
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Poland

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rodrigo Martinez (2 years ago)
Interesting place. It's a quick visit so it's worth going!
AJ (3 years ago)
Nice history, interesting to see. It's rather small, so visiting goes very quick.
Konrad Jones (3 years ago)
Very vibrant buildings. Best enjoyed with sun.
Jonathan Burns (3 years ago)
Important historical site. Worth visiting if your passing through.
Kuba Gajewski (3 years ago)
To he fair we only saw these from outside. Nice to walk by but not much to it. I guess I've seen a fair share of ruins before so wasn't that impressed but they compliment the walk in the old city nicely.
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