Wittichen Abbey is a former Poor Clares abbey founded by Saint Luitgard of Wittichen in 1324. According to Luitgard, who came from the Schenkenzell village of Kaltbrunn-Vortal, God said to her on the site of the monastery: 'Here you are to build me a house!' So she searched for other co-sisters and founded her abbey in the outback of Wittichen with 33 sisters.

The abbey found support from the dukes of Teck and the counts of Geroldseck as well as Queen Agnes of Hungary. Through her intervention the retreat was recognised as an abbey by John XXII. It was in 1540 temporarily closed due to the Reformation and again in the Thirty Years' War (the abbey suffered heavy damages in 1640 and 1663. The monastery was secularized in 1803. After that the monastery came into the possession of the Princely House Furstenberg. Part of the buildings were demolished because of the high costs in the 1850s. The church, the nave and the monastery barn have been preserved, as well as the cemetery.

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Details

Founded: 1324
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Karin Schmid (2 years ago)
Definitely very interesting, unfortunately we were unlucky. The monastery and museum were closed on our visit day. Could only see from the outside, but the church was open. Inconspicuous from the outside, very imposing from the inside.
Karin Schmid (2 years ago)
Definitely very interesting, unfortunately we were unlucky. The monastery and museum were closed on our visit day. Could only see from the outside, but the church was open. Inconspicuous from the outside, very imposing from the inside.
Achim Guenther (2 years ago)
The monastery itself does not seem to be open to visitors. The building is interesting because both the street and a stream go through the building. The place itself is rather quiet and a bit remote. A small side valley from the Kinzig valley.
Achim Guenther (2 years ago)
The monastery itself does not seem to be open to visitors. The building is interesting because both the street and a stream go through the building. The place itself is rather quiet and a bit remote. A small side valley from the Kinzig valley.
Dragan Gugleta (2 years ago)
Very nice place, relaxing
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