The Igel Column is a multi-storeyed Roman sandstone column in the municipality of Igel, Trier, dated to c. 250 AD. The column represents a burial monument of the cloth merchant family of the Secundinii. Measuring 30 m in height, it is crowned by the sculptural group of Jupiter and Ganymede.

The column includes a four-stepped base, a relatively low podium, topped by a projecting cornice, a storey, its flat Corinthian pilasters with decorated shafts, supporting an architrave, a sculptured frieze and a heavy cornice. The bas-reliefs feature a procession of six coloni, bringing various donations to the house of their master. The coloni are received before the entrance to the atrium. The donations consist of a hare, two fish, a kid, an eel, a rooster and a basket of fruit. It is designated as part of the Roman Monuments, Cathedral of St. Peter and Church of Our Lady in Trier UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Trierer Straße 39, Igel, Germany
See all sites in Igel

Details

Founded: c. 250 AD
Category: Statues in Germany
Historical period: Germanic Tribes (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wise one (2 years ago)
History
Carlos Villalobos (2 years ago)
Tall and impressive. Small parking across the street and some food near by if you get the munchies.
Brian (2 years ago)
Historical.
Robert Schmidt (4 years ago)
It's okay
Krzysztof Ziemba (4 years ago)
Toll
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