During the High Middle Ages ownership of Brenz an der Brenz rested with a minor noble family who took their name from the location. Members of this family are mentioned several times in the records from this time. In the Galluskirche there is a gravestone from 1190 for Sebolt von Brenz who is listed as a Crusader. After 1250 a side line of the noble family von Güssenberg occupied Schloss Brenz. To pay debts, the family quickly fell into highway robbery and the castle was destroyed under orders of Louis IV in 1340. However the castle was partly repaired soon afterward.

The Güssen family became too poor to support the castle, and in 1613 sold the entire village and castle to the Duchy of Württemberg. In 1617 Duke Julius Friedrich von Württemberg took the villages of Brenz and Weiltingen under his control, founding the junior Württemberg line of Württemberg-Weiltingen. Schloss Brenz was used as a temporary home for his family. However, the damaged castle was destroyed in 1634 during the Battle of Nördlingen of the Thirty Years' War. In 1672 Duke Friedrich Ferdinand had the castle rebuilt in a Renaissance style. The foundation of the old castle and some portions of the walls are still visible, but most of the castle was built new.

After the junior Württemberg-Weiltingen line died out, Brenz returned to the main line House of Württemberg. Duke Eberhard Ludwig gave the castle to his mistress Wilhelmine von Grävenitz in 1721. When she fell out of favor, she was forced to leave Württemberg and all her gifts behind. Schloss Brenz remained generally empty afterward, though a branch of the family von Racknitz lived in the castle for a short while.

In 1847 the community inherited the castle. It was used for by the city government and also as a school. In 1906 the oldest Community Heritage Museum in Württemberg was founded in the castle. The Baroque portal in the Knights hall was repainted in 1931 by Heinrich Eberhard. The building was renovated in 1972 and the regional Registar as well as the community room for the local Protestant congregation were added.

The castle museum is described as a geological, paleontological and community heritage museum. The museum was founded in 1906 on the initiative of the inhabitants of Brenz an der Brenz. The core of the museum is the collection of notable fossils from the Swabian Jura from professor Hans Wagner. The community heritage section contains earthenware and stoneware, pewter tableware and cast iron stove tops, costumes from the lower Brenztal as well as rural tools.

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Details

Founded: 1672
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jörg Harstick (2 years ago)
Zum feiern hervorragend
Claus -Dieter Schmid (3 years ago)
Ganz klasse Führung. Der Guide ging auf alle Fragen ein, hatte immer eine Antwort und war sehr kompetent.
Horst Koeddermann (3 years ago)
Tolles Ambiente,wunderbar für Heiraten geeignet,alle entsprechenden Einrichtungen vor Ort inklusive Aufzug für Hagerer und sonstige notwendige Ausrüstung
Tomson (3 years ago)
Super Lokalität für Feste. Aufzug, Küche und Toiletten sind vorhanden. Museum ist auch interessant.
Michael Koller (3 years ago)
Schönes kleines aber feines Schlösschen direkt an der Brenz. Kaum überlaufen. Erinnert im Innenhof irgendwie an Südtirol.
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