Ochsenhausen Abbey

Ochsenhausen, Germany

Ochsenhausen Abbey was a Benedictine monastery was founded according a legend in the 9th century when there was a nunnery here called 'Hohenhusen', which was abandoned at the time of the Hungarian invasions in the early 10th century. A ploughing ox later turned up a chest of valuables buried by the nuns before their flight, and the monastery of Ochsenhausen was founded on that spot.

The first Abbey Church of Ochsenhausen was in fact dedicated in 1093. The monastery was initially a priory of St. Blaise's Abbey in the Black Forest, but gained the status of an independent abbey in 1391. In 1495 it became Reichsfrei (territorially independent).

The abbey was secularised in 1803 and in 1806 its territories were absorbed into the Kingdom of Württemberg.

Much of the buildings still survive. They were extensively refurbished in the Baroque style. The Baden-Württemberg State Youth Music Academy is accommodated in part of them. The former abbey church is now the parish church of St. George's.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Emil (22 months ago)
Echt schön! Eine Mischung aus modernen Zimmern aber alte Architektur! Bin außerdem ein großer Fan vom Braukeller in dem es gutes Bier gibt.
johannes gerster (22 months ago)
ein religiöser Ort. aber auch die Landesmusikalademie ist hier eingegliedert. Behinderte sind auch hier willkommen. Auch der jährliche Weihnachtsmarkt Ochsenhausen leuchtet auf dem Klosterhof sollte besucht werden. Ebenso das Im Areal befindliche Forst&Jagdmuseum
Joe PD56 (2 years ago)
Gross,alt mit ehrwürdiger Geschichte. Die Führung ist toll, viele Hintergründe wurden erzählt.
Dominik Gierl (3 years ago)
Beautiful and historical, but really really boring.
Kate M. (3 years ago)
If you ever come to Ochsenhausen you def have to visit here. Absolutely stunning!
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