Inzlingen Castle

Inzlingen, Germany

Inzlingen Castle is surrounded by a moat situated in the village of Inzlingen. The origins of the castle cannot be clearly dated. The first written evidence dated 1511 – at this time already a possession of a relative of the barons Reich von Reichenstein. This noble family hold fiefdoms from the Prince-Bishopric of Basel, the Margraviate of Baden and the House of Habsburg. A Prince-bishop of Basel, six mayors of Basel and a principal of Basel University came from this noble family. In 1394 Margrave Rudolf III. enfeoffed Heinrich Reich von Reichenstein with the right for high justice regarding the village of Inzlingen and afterwards the family was in a position to acquire also a substantial landholding within this village and named themselves Lords of Inzlingen. A first major conversion of the castle dated 1563 to 1566. A copper engraving published 1625 shows the buildings at this time. Later (1674 to 1745) the buildings were converted to a Baroque style and at about 1750 a Baroque interior followed.

Since 1820 the castle was a domicile for a weaving mill producing silk ribbons and afterwards it was used for a century as a farm house. In 1969 Inzlingen Castle was purchased by the municipality of Inzlingen and renovated thereafter. Since 1978 it functions as city hall of the municipality of Inzlingen. Furthermore there is a luxury restaurant within the castle.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Klaus-Dieter Neumann (11 months ago)
Sehr schöne kleine Anlage mit der Möglichkeit verschiedene Wanderungen rund um Inzlingen zu machen. Wer genug Geld im Portmonaie hat, kann Ich noch in den Gourmet Tempel zum Luxus Essen
Philip Schaffner (2 years ago)
Beautiful location, excellent food and very welcoming hosts and staff. Not a single thing to improve.
Junaid Ali Shah (3 years ago)
Small town, beautiful landscape
Kirsten Wolfford (3 years ago)
Beautiful grounds, historic setting. Castle with a moat, what more could you ask for?!
Ilario Musio (4 years ago)
Fine food and excellent view when eating outside
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