Denghoog is a Neolithic passage grave dating from around 3000 BC on the northern edge of Wenningstedt-Braderup on the German Island of Sylt. The name Denghoog derives from the Söl'ring Deng (Thing) and Hoog (Hill).

Denghoog is an artificial hill created in the 4th millennium BC on top of a passage grave. The hill today has a height of around 3.5 metres and a diameter at the base of around 32 metres. The internal chamber is ellipsoid, measuring about 5 metres by 3 metres. Its roof is supported by twelve large boulders. The space between them is covered by dry stone walls made up of so-called Zwickelsteine. Three huge boulders, weighing around 20 metric tons each, form the roof of about 75 cm thickness. These stones are glacial erratics, carried here in the ice age from Scandinavia. The spaces between the roof stones are also filled with dry stone walling. A layer of firm blue clay, brought here from the eastern side of the island, mixed with stone fragments almost completely waterproofs the roof. Above this is a layer of yellow sand, covered by a final layer of humus.

A passage of six metres length and a height of one metre leads into the chamber. Several other stone blocks were found scattered around the base of the hill. These have been interpreted as the remains of a stone circle on top of the hill.

The hill was first opened for archeaeological research in 1868 by Ferdinand Wibel, a professor of geology. He found an undisturbed grave chamber that was divided in three sections.Wibel found a complete pottery jar and shards of 24 other vessels, 11 of which could be reassembled or completed. The largest of these, a Schultergefäss has a height of 38 cm and a diameter of 31 cm. Other burial objects included stone tools (hatchets, chisels, 20 flint blades, a pyrite bulb for making fire and two circular holed discs with a diameter of 10 to 12 cm. There were also six amber pearls (one of them labrys-shaped) and fragments of a seventh pearl. All of these findings are today exhibited at the Archäologisches Landesmuseum in Schloss Gottorf, in Schleswig.

By its shape and ornamentation, the pottery found inside the tomb indicates a date between 3200 and 3000 BC. It is likely that the Denghoog served as a burial site for a family or clan over a period spanning several generations.

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Amber Hazel (3 years ago)
Ein Muss, dieses wunderbare, begehbare Hünengrab. Der liebenswerte Kassenguide hat uns mit seinen interessanten Ausführungen super eingestimmt, es hat Spaß gemacht, den Abstieg über eine kleine Leiter durch eine Luke von oben zu wagen. Nichts für Leute mit Platzangst oder großem Umfang. Allerdings gibt es vorn noch einen Zugang, hier gelangt man aber nur kriechend auf allen Vieren oder im Entengang hinein. Was für ein Abenteuer! Hat man es nach drinnen geschafft, kann man sich auf kleine Bänke setzen und den gigantischen Anblick der besonderen Steine genießen.
Steffen Colditz (3 years ago)
Ist zwar nicht so viel zu Sehen aber dafür sind die erzählten Geschichten des verantwortlichen Mitarbeiters sehr interessant.
Suddelcool200 (3 years ago)
Cool
Karin Siller (3 years ago)
Sehr sehenswertes,5000 Jahre altes Grosssteingrab.Man kann es sich garnicht vorstellen,wie die Menschen in der Zeit so eine Leistung vollbringen konnten.Der Einstieg für Erwachsene kostet etwas Überwindung, macht jedoch riesigen Spass dort runterzusteigen.Kinder nehmen den kleinen Eingang.Der Mitarbeiter an der Kasse hat sich viel Zeit genommen und mir alles erklärt.Auf jeden Fall anschauen,lohnt sich!!!
Britta Elser (3 years ago)
Tipp
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