Denghoog is a Neolithic passage grave dating from around 3000 BC on the northern edge of Wenningstedt-Braderup on the German Island of Sylt. The name Denghoog derives from the Söl'ring Deng (Thing) and Hoog (Hill).

Denghoog is an artificial hill created in the 4th millennium BC on top of a passage grave. The hill today has a height of around 3.5 metres and a diameter at the base of around 32 metres. The internal chamber is ellipsoid, measuring about 5 metres by 3 metres. Its roof is supported by twelve large boulders. The space between them is covered by dry stone walls made up of so-called Zwickelsteine. Three huge boulders, weighing around 20 metric tons each, form the roof of about 75 cm thickness. These stones are glacial erratics, carried here in the ice age from Scandinavia. The spaces between the roof stones are also filled with dry stone walling. A layer of firm blue clay, brought here from the eastern side of the island, mixed with stone fragments almost completely waterproofs the roof. Above this is a layer of yellow sand, covered by a final layer of humus.

A passage of six metres length and a height of one metre leads into the chamber. Several other stone blocks were found scattered around the base of the hill. These have been interpreted as the remains of a stone circle on top of the hill.

The hill was first opened for archeaeological research in 1868 by Ferdinand Wibel, a professor of geology. He found an undisturbed grave chamber that was divided in three sections.Wibel found a complete pottery jar and shards of 24 other vessels, 11 of which could be reassembled or completed. The largest of these, a Schultergefäss has a height of 38 cm and a diameter of 31 cm. Other burial objects included stone tools (hatchets, chisels, 20 flint blades, a pyrite bulb for making fire and two circular holed discs with a diameter of 10 to 12 cm. There were also six amber pearls (one of them labrys-shaped) and fragments of a seventh pearl. All of these findings are today exhibited at the Archäologisches Landesmuseum in Schloss Gottorf, in Schleswig.

By its shape and ornamentation, the pottery found inside the tomb indicates a date between 3200 and 3000 BC. It is likely that the Denghoog served as a burial site for a family or clan over a period spanning several generations.

References:

Comments

Your name



Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Amber Hazel (3 years ago)
Ein Muss, dieses wunderbare, begehbare Hünengrab. Der liebenswerte Kassenguide hat uns mit seinen interessanten Ausführungen super eingestimmt, es hat Spaß gemacht, den Abstieg über eine kleine Leiter durch eine Luke von oben zu wagen. Nichts für Leute mit Platzangst oder großem Umfang. Allerdings gibt es vorn noch einen Zugang, hier gelangt man aber nur kriechend auf allen Vieren oder im Entengang hinein. Was für ein Abenteuer! Hat man es nach drinnen geschafft, kann man sich auf kleine Bänke setzen und den gigantischen Anblick der besonderen Steine genießen.
Steffen Colditz (3 years ago)
Ist zwar nicht so viel zu Sehen aber dafür sind die erzählten Geschichten des verantwortlichen Mitarbeiters sehr interessant.
Suddelcool200 (3 years ago)
Cool
Karin Siller (3 years ago)
Sehr sehenswertes,5000 Jahre altes Grosssteingrab.Man kann es sich garnicht vorstellen,wie die Menschen in der Zeit so eine Leistung vollbringen konnten.Der Einstieg für Erwachsene kostet etwas Überwindung, macht jedoch riesigen Spass dort runterzusteigen.Kinder nehmen den kleinen Eingang.Der Mitarbeiter an der Kasse hat sich viel Zeit genommen und mir alles erklärt.Auf jeden Fall anschauen,lohnt sich!!!
Britta Elser (3 years ago)
Tipp
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Roman Walls of Lugo

Roman Walls of Lugo are an exceptional architectural, archaeological and constructive legacy of Roman engineering, dating from the 3rd and 4th centuries AD. The Walls are built of internal and external stone facings of slate with some granite, with a core filling of a conglomerate of slate slabs and worked stone pieces from Roman buildings, interlocked with lime mortar.

Their total length of 2117 m in the shape of an oblong rectangle occupies an area of 1.68 ha. Their height varies between 8 and 10 m, with a width of 4.2 m, reaching 7 m in some specific points. The walls still contain 85 external towers, 10 gates (five of which are original and five that were opened in modern times), four staircases and two ramps providing access to the walkway along the top of the walls, one of which is internal and the other external. Each tower contained access stairs leading from the intervallum to the wall walk of town wall, of which a total of 21 have been discovered to date.

The defences of Lugo are the most complete and best preserved example of Roman military architecture in the Western Roman Empire.

Despite the renovation work carried out, the walls conserve their original layout and the construction features associated with their defensive purpose, with walls, battlements, towers, fortifications, both modern and original gates and stairways, and a moat.

Since they were built, the walls have defined the layout and growth of the city, which was declared a Historical-Artistic Ensemble in 1973, forming a part of it and becoming an emblematic structure that can be freely accessed to walk along. The local inhabitants and visitors alike have used them as an area for enjoyment and as a part of urban life for centuries.

The fortifications were added to UNESCO"s World Heritage List in late 2000 and are a popular tourist attraction.