Geisenklösterle is a cave near Blaubeuren and an important site for the European Upper Paleolithic. It is one of a number of caves where early modern humans in the Aurignacian, between 43,000 and 30,000 years ago left traces of early artwork. Geisenklösterle was first archaeologically explored in 1963. Systematic excavations began in 1973, from 1974 to 2002 sponsored by the land of Baden-Württemberg. A 1983 monographical publication summarized the results up to that time.

The cave has six levels belonging to the Aurignacian and seven levels of the Gravettian, besides earlier levels belonging to the Middle Paleolithic and later ones spanning the Magdalenian down to the Middle Ages. The Aurignacian levels date to between 43,000 and 32,000 years ago, and yielded stone tools, artefacts made from antlers, bones and ivory. Among the most notable items are a sculpture of a flutes of bird bone and mammoth ivory, the oldest known musical instruments with an age of 42,000 to 43,000 years.

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Details

Founded: 41,000 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: Paleolithic to Neolithic Period (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Thomas Veit (4 years ago)
Schöne gegend zum laufen radfahren und cachen
Thorsten Roll (5 years ago)
Schöner Ort
Beth Velliky (5 years ago)
Great cave and nice view of the Achtal.
CDUwe Suhr (5 years ago)
Schönes Wanderziel in der näheren Umgebung von Blaubeuren. Gut zu Fuß zu erreichen,ohne alpinistische Fähigkeiten zu haben. Von oben ein atemberaubender Überblick über das Tal.
Josh Emmitt (5 years ago)
This is an awesome place to visit if you have an interest in Paleolithic archaeology. The site just got UNESCO World Heritage status so there are a lot of changes happening at the moment. The climb up to the site isn't too bad but can be a bit slippery. The site itself is enclosed but you can see inside and there are also lines that have been hung to reconstruct the method of diving the site during exacavation. There are also some nice views of the valley from here.
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