Zwiefalten Abbey was a Benedictine monastery founded in 1089 at the time of the Investiture Controversy by Counts Gero and Kuno of Achalm, advised by Bishop Adalbero of Würzburg and Abbot William of Hirsau. The first monks were also from Hirsau Abbey, home of the Hirsau Reforms (under the influence of the Cluniac reforms), which strongly influenced the new foundation. Noker von Zwiefalten was the first abbot and led from 1065–90.

During the 12th century Saint Ernest (died 1148) was abbot. Between 1145 and 1149 he participated in the Second Crusade to regain the Holy Lands including Jerusalem.

Although Pope Urban VI granted special privileges to it, Zwiefalten Abbey was nevertheless the private monastery of the Counts of Achalm, later succeeded by the Counts of Württemberg. The abbey was plundered in 1525 during the German Peasants' War. Christoph Rassler was abbot from 1658–75 and Augustin Stegmüller was abbot in the 18th century.

In 1750 the abbey was granted the status of Reichsabtei, which meant that it had the status of an independent power subject only to the Imperial Crown and was free of the rule of Württemberg. On 25 November 1802, however, it was secularised and dissolved and became a lunatic asylum and later psychiatric hospital, which it is today, as well as the site of the Württemberg Psychiatry Museum.

The present buildings were constructed in German Baroque style from 1739–47 under the direction of Johann Michael Fischer (1692–1766) of Munich, who began overseeing the work in 1741. The interior, considered a model of Baroque design, is filled with ornate chapels and gilded balustrades, dominated by the high altar, which combines a Gothic statue of the Virgin Mary dating from 1430 with Baroque additions (dating from about 1750) by Johann Joseph Christian (1706–77). The elaborate frescoes are by Franz Joseph Spiegler (1691–1757).

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Details

Founded: 1089
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alexander Lueling (8 months ago)
Very nice of and relaxing!
Ute Plengsken-Mir (8 months ago)
For the people who don't know, the park is NOT public, it belongs to the ZFP. So you can be expelled from the park at any time! Visitors should also know that dogs are not allowed there! There are no signs anywhere, even direct residents (like I was for years) don't know that.
Andi F. (9 months ago)
Nice park, ideal for a short rest and relaxation in between.
RW J (11 months ago)
No entry fees. A very beautiful park that belongs to the historic monastery complex. Numerous park benches and well laid out paths, plus a water canal, the so-called convent ditch. Especially in autumn there are very beautiful foliage colors on the trees, and all in the shade of the grandiose Zwiefalter Minster.
Pascal Biteau (2 years ago)
Very nice
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