Desenzano Roman Villa

Desenzano del Garda, Italy

The Roman Villa of Desenzano del Garda, with rich mosaics, is one of the residential buildings of the best preserved late Roman age of Northern Italy. A group of rooms with heating systems to cavity is from the first half of the 1st century AD, which probably belongs to the General system of the complex. In the first half of the 4th century, the mansion underwent a complete and organic reconstruction led to the creation of a wing used for representation, another mainly residential and a third character.

Archeological excavations reveal that the villa was destroyed by fire. The villa still retains the charm of the original glitz and one can still admire the remains of mosaics, walls and foundations. At the entrance of the villa stands a small museum where you can see the finds recovered from the excavations. These include the remains of the statues and portraits are very interesting and a mill for the pressing of grapes or olives. Inside the Museum a cockpit also allows you to see a hypocaust, a hypocaust that was part of a series of rooms with brick pillars on which rested the floor likely Augustan era.

The Roman Villa of Desenzano is divided into three sectors. In the field to include an octagonal vestibule from which you came to the beach and the Marina, the peristyle, a courtyard surrounded on all sides by porticos and adorned with statues, an atrium to forceps for came to the room triclinium with three aspes and representation. The triclinium was covered by a dome roof or barrel vaulted. The local and the peristyle were paved with mosaics showing geometric patterns and vegetal motifs which created colour effects. Probably in the Central apse of the triclinium there was a window from which you could see the viridarium, enclosed garden at the back by a fountain with niches. After a series of small rooms used in services there was the entrance to the villa from which there was the road separating the sector to sector b. In this sector, which underwent numerous transformations in Roman times, there are various clubs and residential environments have geometric mosaics supposedly dating to the late 3rd century or early 4th century after Christ.

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Details

Founded: 0-300 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

April Miller (2 years ago)
Incredible site! Must see while in Lake Garda
Michael N (2 years ago)
Small but enjoyable museum and archeological site. Worth a quick visit if you’re into this sort of thing.
Paul Gipson (2 years ago)
A small Roman villa to explore with well restored mosaics. Not expensive and a good place to spend 30 minutes. I suggest downloading the guide (app) before you go.
Umar Farooque (2 years ago)
Nice and small place with lots of mosaics dating back to roman era. If you like architecture and roman style especially.. you would appreciate it. Not too big so could be visited in less than an hour. The ancient roman villa lies in between modern habitat so the feeling it gives is pretty contrasting. You would have a nice perspective about how things were and are. The mosaics themselves are very detailed and stored in great condition. They vary from patterns and designs to animals and figures.
Mary Frances Jarmusz (3 years ago)
This ancient villa had absolutely stunning mosaics and great examples of hypocausts (the area under the floor for heating the room). The people working there were also very nice.
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