Desenzano Roman Villa

Desenzano del Garda, Italy

The Roman Villa of Desenzano del Garda, with rich mosaics, is one of the residential buildings of the best preserved late Roman age of Northern Italy. A group of rooms with heating systems to cavity is from the first half of the 1st century AD, which probably belongs to the General system of the complex. In the first half of the 4th century, the mansion underwent a complete and organic reconstruction led to the creation of a wing used for representation, another mainly residential and a third character.

Archeological excavations reveal that the villa was destroyed by fire. The villa still retains the charm of the original glitz and one can still admire the remains of mosaics, walls and foundations. At the entrance of the villa stands a small museum where you can see the finds recovered from the excavations. These include the remains of the statues and portraits are very interesting and a mill for the pressing of grapes or olives. Inside the Museum a cockpit also allows you to see a hypocaust, a hypocaust that was part of a series of rooms with brick pillars on which rested the floor likely Augustan era.

The Roman Villa of Desenzano is divided into three sectors. In the field to include an octagonal vestibule from which you came to the beach and the Marina, the peristyle, a courtyard surrounded on all sides by porticos and adorned with statues, an atrium to forceps for came to the room triclinium with three aspes and representation. The triclinium was covered by a dome roof or barrel vaulted. The local and the peristyle were paved with mosaics showing geometric patterns and vegetal motifs which created colour effects. Probably in the Central apse of the triclinium there was a window from which you could see the viridarium, enclosed garden at the back by a fountain with niches. After a series of small rooms used in services there was the entrance to the villa from which there was the road separating the sector to sector b. In this sector, which underwent numerous transformations in Roman times, there are various clubs and residential environments have geometric mosaics supposedly dating to the late 3rd century or early 4th century after Christ.

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Founded: 0-300 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chrisy Dawson (2 years ago)
Very interesting if your are a history buff. Site of Roman Villa close to Lake Garda and walking distance from the town centre . Also has a museum
Pip Toogood (3 years ago)
The villa is tucked in back street behind the seafront. There isn't much to see, but the museum explains that this is the corner of a much larger villa complex, most of which is buried under the modern town. It's a shame that the signs are only in Italian and German, which made it difficult to interpret the site. But it's worth visiting for the mosaics, several of which are very high quality with beautiful plants and animals.
Valerii Danilov (3 years ago)
Good exposition of Roman building approaches.
Mark Webber (3 years ago)
Amazing place do not miss, fully recommended. Just a few photos to show you what it is like. Loads more to see and please take a visit, was only €4 per person.
Paul Homden (3 years ago)
If you love excitement and thrills then go somewhere else. This place has some fascinating ruins and we'll preserved mosaics.
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