Juliet's House

Verona, Italy

Juliet Capulet is the female protagonist and one of two title characters in William Shakespeare's romantic love tragedy Romeo and Juliet. The so-called Juliet's House features the balcony where Romeo promised his beloved Juliet eternal love in Shakespeare’s famous tragedy. The building, dating back to the 13th and renovated in the last century.

Young couples are still very moved by the right of this house and unmarried people touch Juliet’s statue (a kind of good-luck ritual) in the hope of finding the love of their life. How many hopes and desires has this court-yard witnessed over the ages.

The interior of the house can be visited and you can stand on Juliet’s balcony and re-live the “ high-light” of the earthly life, as well as admire the furniture and the beautiful velvet costumes worn by the actors in the Metro Goldwyn Meyer’s colossal “ Romeo and Juliet”.

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    Address

    Via Cappello 23, Verona, Italy
    See all sites in Verona

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    More Information

    www.tourism.verona.it

    Rating

    4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Adriana Perez (5 months ago)
    It's one of those places you just gotta see if you're in Verona but there isn't anything too impressive about it. There is a nice statue of Juliet in the courtyard, the famous balcony and some "lover's walls" around it, filled with sticky notes, love locks and even some chewed up gum. It's nice if you're into the whole "Romeo & Juliet" fascination, but nothing above an average tourist spot.
    Jennifer Bou Eid (5 months ago)
    I went there on the valentine's day and actually it was a lovely place all full by hearts and love surrounded. I thought it would be bigger but actually these are the houses in Italy and in Verona specially. It was a lovely experience
    Donald Peter (5 months ago)
    Amazing! We just came here from Birmingham this afternoon and straight to this place. Really lots of people, especially the couples making their lovely moments by kissing their partner in the middle of the square of Romeo and Juliet. The walls has full of sign of ❤️
    Anton Trukhanyonok (5 months ago)
    A cheesy touristy attraction. The house where a fictional character lived. You can go inside for €10 and write something about your love on the wall, but I decided that a photo of the balcony from the outside would be enough. Worth visiting if you are passing by.
    You Tube (5 months ago)
    You cannot go to Verona and miss Juliet's house. Worth a visit in the inside as it's a beautiful middle age house extremely well preserved. The balcony is very close to the Arena and right near the main shopping thoroughfare. It is worth the time to pay homage to a literary masterpiece. The Juliet's family owned this house, but the balcony is not the original. Even if it is not the true balcony the feeling of romanticism is palpable.
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