Juliet's House

Verona, Italy

Juliet Capulet is the female protagonist and one of two title characters in William Shakespeare's romantic love tragedy Romeo and Juliet. The so-called Juliet's House features the balcony where Romeo promised his beloved Juliet eternal love in Shakespeare’s famous tragedy. The building, dating back to the 13th and renovated in the last century.

Young couples are still very moved by the right of this house and unmarried people touch Juliet’s statue (a kind of good-luck ritual) in the hope of finding the love of their life. How many hopes and desires has this court-yard witnessed over the ages.

The interior of the house can be visited and you can stand on Juliet’s balcony and re-live the “ high-light” of the earthly life, as well as admire the furniture and the beautiful velvet costumes worn by the actors in the Metro Goldwyn Meyer’s colossal “ Romeo and Juliet”.

References:

    Comments

    Your name

    Website (optional)



    Address

    Via Cappello 23, Verona, Italy
    See all sites in Verona

    Details


    Category:

    More Information

    www.tourism.verona.it

    Rating

    4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Adriana Perez (15 months ago)
    It's one of those places you just gotta see if you're in Verona but there isn't anything too impressive about it. There is a nice statue of Juliet in the courtyard, the famous balcony and some "lover's walls" around it, filled with sticky notes, love locks and even some chewed up gum. It's nice if you're into the whole "Romeo & Juliet" fascination, but nothing above an average tourist spot.
    Jennifer Bou Eid (15 months ago)
    I went there on the valentine's day and actually it was a lovely place all full by hearts and love surrounded. I thought it would be bigger but actually these are the houses in Italy and in Verona specially. It was a lovely experience
    Donald Peter (15 months ago)
    Amazing! We just came here from Birmingham this afternoon and straight to this place. Really lots of people, especially the couples making their lovely moments by kissing their partner in the middle of the square of Romeo and Juliet. The walls has full of sign of ❤️
    Anton Trukhanyonok (15 months ago)
    A cheesy touristy attraction. The house where a fictional character lived. You can go inside for €10 and write something about your love on the wall, but I decided that a photo of the balcony from the outside would be enough. Worth visiting if you are passing by.
    You Tube (15 months ago)
    You cannot go to Verona and miss Juliet's house. Worth a visit in the inside as it's a beautiful middle age house extremely well preserved. The balcony is very close to the Arena and right near the main shopping thoroughfare. It is worth the time to pay homage to a literary masterpiece. The Juliet's family owned this house, but the balcony is not the original. Even if it is not the true balcony the feeling of romanticism is palpable.
    Powered by Google

    Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

    Historic Site of the week

    Klis Fortress

    From its origin as a small stronghold built by the ancient Illyrian tribe Dalmatae, becoming a royal castle that was the seat of many Croatian kings, to its final development as a large fortress during the Ottoman wars in Europe, Klis Fortress has guarded the frontier, being lost and re-conquered several times. Due to its location on a pass that separates the mountains Mosor and Kozjak, the fortress served as a major source of defense in Dalmatia, especially against the Ottoman advance, and has been a key crossroad between the Mediterranean belt and the Balkan rear.

    Since Duke Mislav of the Duchy of Croatia made Klis Fortress the seat of his throne in the middle of the 9th century, the fortress served as the seat of many Croatia"s rulers. The reign of his successor, Duke Trpimir I, the founder of the Croatian royal House of Trpimirović, is significant for spreading Christianity in the Duchy of Croatia. He largely expanded the Klis Fortress, and in Rižinice, in the valley under the fortress, he built a church and the first Benedictine monastery in Croatia. During the reign of the first Croatian king, Tomislav, Klis and Biograd na Moru were his chief residences.

    In March 1242 at Klis Fortress, Tatars who were a constituent segment of the Mongol army under the leadership of Kadan suffered a major defeat while in pursuit of the Hungarian army led by King Béla IV. After their defeat by Croatian forces, the Mongols retreated, and Béla IV rewarded many Croatian towns and nobles with 'substantial riches'. During the Late Middle Ages, the fortress was governed by Croatian nobility, amongst whom Paul I Šubić of Bribir was the most significant. During his reign, the House of Šubić controlled most of modern-day Croatia and Bosnia. Excluding the brief possession by the forces of Bosnian King, Tvrtko I, the fortress remained in Hungaro-Croatian hands for the next several hundred years, until the 16th century.

    Klis Fortress is probably best known for its defense against the Ottoman invasion of Europe in the early 16th century. Croatian captain Petar Kružić led the defense of the fortress against a Turkish invasion and siege that lasted for more than two and a half decades. During this defense, as Kružić and his soldiers fought without allies against the Turks, the military faction of Uskoks was formed, which later became famous as an elite Croatian militant sect. Ultimately, the defenders were defeated and the fortress was occupied by the Ottomans in 1537. After more than a century under Ottoman rule, in 1669, Klis Fortress was besieged and seized by the Republic of Venice, thus moving the border between Christian and Muslim Europe further east and helping to contribute to the decline of the Ottoman Empire. The Venetians restored and enlarged the fortress, but it was taken by the Austrians after Napoleon extinguished the republic itself in 1797. Today, Klis Fortress contains a museum where visitors to this historic military structure can see an array of arms, armor, and traditional uniforms.