Sirmione Castle

Sirmione, Italy

Sirmione castle was built near the end of the 12th century as part of a defensive network surrounding Verona. The castle was maintained and extended first as part of the Veronese protection against their rivals in Milan and later under the control of the Venetian inland empire. The massive fortress is totally surrounded by water and has an inner porch which houses a Roman and Medieval lapidary. From the drawbridge, a staircase leads to the walkways above the walls, providing a marvellous view of the harbour that once sheltered the Scaliger fleet. The doors were fitted with a variety of locking systems, including a drawbridge for horses, carriages and pedestrians, a metal grate and, more recently, double hinged doors. Venice conquered Sirmione in 1405, immediately adopting provisions to render the fortress even more secure, fortifying its outer walls and widening the harbour.

Thanks to its strategical geographical location as a border outpost, Sirmione became a crucial defence and control garrison for the ruling nobles, retaining this function until the 16th century, when its role was taken up by Peschiera del Garda.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

王文龙 (8 months ago)
Very nice place. Even though the castle is not so big, it is protected very well. it remains the full shape as several hundred years ago. Also the landscape on the top of main tower is wonderful. Thanks to the unbelievable landform, this castle is unique in the world.
Terry Hearldon (8 months ago)
Lovely place and beautiful historical town. I have no doubt that you would love your visit here. Viva Italia!
Rich (8 months ago)
Sirmione Castle you have to visit. So beautiful place. High season lot of people.
Inci Sirman (9 months ago)
It's a beautiful ruin and very easily accessible. You can climb up to the tower for gorgeous views. Bit scary part on top if you're not so good with heights, but views are well worth it. There isn't a lot to see otherwise. Location is great and you have nice views all around. I was there just before all the Xmas decorations came off, so it was great, with lights everywhere. Very romantic.
Pip Toogood (11 months ago)
There isn't much of the castle left, so there isn't really much to see inside. But you can walk round most of the walls and peer down into the fortified harbour - it was great watching the pleasure boats take passengers round the island. From the top of the tower there are good views of Sirmione and Lake Garda, and it's worth the 5 euros admission just for that.
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