Sirmione Castle

Sirmione, Italy

Sirmione castle was built near the end of the 12th century as part of a defensive network surrounding Verona. The castle was maintained and extended first as part of the Veronese protection against their rivals in Milan and later under the control of the Venetian inland empire. The massive fortress is totally surrounded by water and has an inner porch which houses a Roman and Medieval lapidary. From the drawbridge, a staircase leads to the walkways above the walls, providing a marvellous view of the harbour that once sheltered the Scaliger fleet. The doors were fitted with a variety of locking systems, including a drawbridge for horses, carriages and pedestrians, a metal grate and, more recently, double hinged doors. Venice conquered Sirmione in 1405, immediately adopting provisions to render the fortress even more secure, fortifying its outer walls and widening the harbour.

Thanks to its strategical geographical location as a border outpost, Sirmione became a crucial defence and control garrison for the ruling nobles, retaining this function until the 16th century, when its role was taken up by Peschiera del Garda.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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王文龙 (2 years ago)
Very nice place. Even though the castle is not so big, it is protected very well. it remains the full shape as several hundred years ago. Also the landscape on the top of main tower is wonderful. Thanks to the unbelievable landform, this castle is unique in the world.
Terry Hearldon (2 years ago)
Lovely place and beautiful historical town. I have no doubt that you would love your visit here. Viva Italia!
Rich (2 years ago)
Sirmione Castle you have to visit. So beautiful place. High season lot of people.
Inci Sirman (2 years ago)
It's a beautiful ruin and very easily accessible. You can climb up to the tower for gorgeous views. Bit scary part on top if you're not so good with heights, but views are well worth it. There isn't a lot to see otherwise. Location is great and you have nice views all around. I was there just before all the Xmas decorations came off, so it was great, with lights everywhere. Very romantic.
Pip Toogood (3 years ago)
There isn't much of the castle left, so there isn't really much to see inside. But you can walk round most of the walls and peer down into the fortified harbour - it was great watching the pleasure boats take passengers round the island. From the top of the tower there are good views of Sirmione and Lake Garda, and it's worth the 5 euros admission just for that.
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Angelokastro

Angelokastro is a Byzantine castle on the island of Corfu. It is located at the top of the highest peak of the island"s shoreline in the northwest coast near Palaiokastritsa and built on particularly precipitous and rocky terrain. It stands 305 m on a steep cliff above the sea and surveys the City of Corfu and the mountains of mainland Greece to the southeast and a wide area of Corfu toward the northeast and northwest.

Angelokastro is one of the most important fortified complexes of Corfu. It was an acropolis which surveyed the region all the way to the southern Adriatic and presented a formidable strategic vantage point to the occupant of the castle.

Angelokastro formed a defensive triangle with the castles of Gardiki and Kassiopi, which covered Corfu"s defences to the south, northwest and northeast.

The castle never fell, despite frequent sieges and attempts at conquering it through the centuries, and played a decisive role in defending the island against pirate incursions and during three sieges of Corfu by the Ottomans, significantly contributing to their defeat.

During invasions it helped shelter the local peasant population. The villagers also fought against the invaders playing an active role in the defence of the castle.

The exact period of the building of the castle is not known, but it has often been attributed to the reigns of Michael I Komnenos and his son Michael II Komnenos. The first documentary evidence for the fortress dates to 1272, when Giordano di San Felice took possession of it for Charles of Anjou, who had seized Corfu from Manfred, King of Sicily in 1267.

From 1387 to the end of the 16th century, Angelokastro was the official capital of Corfu and the seat of the Provveditore Generale del Levante, governor of the Ionian islands and commander of the Venetian fleet, which was stationed in Corfu.

The governor of the castle (the castellan) was normally appointed by the City council of Corfu and was chosen amongst the noblemen of the island.

Angelokastro is considered one of the most imposing architectural remains in the Ionian Islands.