Scaliger Tombs

Verona, Italy

The Scaliger Tombs is a group of five Gothic funerary monuments in Verona, celebrating the Scaliger family, who ruled in Verona from the 13th to the late 14th century.

The tombs are located in a court of the church of Santa Maria Antica, separated from the street by a wall with iron grilles. Built in Gothic style, they are a series of tombs, most of which are in the shape of a small temple and covered by a baldachin. According to the French historian Georges Duby, they are one of the most outstanding examples of Gothic art.

The tombs are placed within a wrought iron enclosure decorated with a stair motif, in reference to the Italian meaning of the name of the family, della Scala. The tombs are made for the members of the Scaliger dynasty Cangrande I (the first tomb built), Mastino II, Cansignorio, Alberto II and Giovanni.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: c. 1329
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pei Chuan Chang (3 years ago)
Interesting architecture style and history!
Natasa Rockov (3 years ago)
Magnificent!
Sharjeel Khan (3 years ago)
It has amazing architecture!
Tatiana Nosova (4 years ago)
Arches Scaligers Verona, Via Santa Maria Antica, 1 The arches of Scaligero, the tombs of the three rulers of Verona from the dynasty ruling there in the 13-14 centuries, are the only one of a kind “suspended” burial, a monument of medieval Gothic. The family coat of arms depicts a staircase (it. Scala), from this word the name of the founder of the family, Mastino della Scala, originated. Soaring burials, despite the beautiful architectural ensemble, look a bit gloomy ... in my opinion ... Although it is very subjective. In any case, interesting, unusual and informative
Hiren Soni (4 years ago)
No need to spend a euro. You will see mostly all that is too see from outside.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Petersberg Citadel

The Petersberg Citadel is one of the largest extant early-modern citadels in Europe and covers the whole north-western part of the Erfurt city centre. It was built after 1665 on Petersberg hill and was in military use until 1963. It dates from a time when Erfurt was ruled by the Electors of Mainz and is a unique example of the European style of fortress construction. Beneath the citadel is an underground maze of passageways that can be visited on guided tours organised by Erfurt Tourist Office.

The citadel was originally built on the site of a medieval Benedictine Monastery and the earliest parts of the complex date from the 12th century. Erfurt has also been ruled by Sweden, Prussia, Napoleon, the German Empire, the Nazis, and post-World War II Soviet occupying forces, and it was part of the German Democratic Republic (East Germany). All of these regimes used Petersberg Citadel and had an influence on its development. The baroque fortress was in military use until 1963. Since German reunification in 1990, the citadel has undergone significant restoration and it is now open to the public as a historic site.