Kinloch Castle is a late Victorian mansion built as a private residence for Sir George Bullough, a textile tycoon from Lancashire whose father bought Rùm island as his summer residence and shooting estate. Construction began in 1897, and was completed in 1900. Built as a luxurious retreat, Kinloch Castle has since declined. The castle and island are now owned by Scottish Natural Heritage, and part of the castle operates as a hostel.

Kinloch Castle is protected as a category A listed building, and the grounds are included in the Inventory of Gardens and Designed Landscapes in Scotland, the national listing of significant gardens.

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Founded: 1897-1900
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sophie S (4 months ago)
A quirky castle on the Isle of Rum, and efforts are underway to restore it. If you take a tour inside or even peek into the windows you'll see a lot of eclectic decorations and ornaments. Very interesting!
Layla Lucia (14 months ago)
Brilliant masonry.
Joey Heirman (3 years ago)
Extraordinary place on a barely populated island. Had a great tour with the local guide who told us about lots of great local historic lore. Interesting stories, great insights in how the owners used to live there. The place is a bit worn down, due to the lack of funds. Hope they get the money to restore it to it's former glory, the castle deserves it.
Donald Cameron (3 years ago)
Best castle visit I've ever been on. The guide Ross was excellent, really informative and entertaining. Well worth the effort getting there. Rum is a phenomenal place, full of history, will be back again soon.
Tonto Samouelle (3 years ago)
Wonderful guided tour to see how the other half lived.
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