Dunvegan Castle was the seat of Clan MacLeod chiefs. Dunvegan Castle is the oldest continuously inhabited castle in Scotland and has been the stronghold of the chiefs of the clan for 800 years. A curtain wall was built round the hill in the 13th century around a former Norse fort which was only accessible through a sea gate. A castle was constructed within the curtain wall by Malcolm MacLeod around 1350.

Today Dunvegan castle is open to the public.

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Details

Founded: c. 1350
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pri Figueiredo (15 months ago)
Dunvegan is definitely worth visiting while in Skye. You get to step inside the longest inhabited castle in Scotland, you can wander about its beautiful gardens and even see its waterfall. Plus, there's the fairy flag inside, which supposedly has magical powers to help the clan chief in times of danger and strife!
Tracy Spiller Robertson (15 months ago)
Beautiful and amazing location. Stayed in Keepers Cottage - amazing. Warm all equipped. Shame it doesn't have a bath as the shower isn't great, electric and small.
rita newby (2 years ago)
Whether it's Seal watching, beautifully landscaped gardens or a bit of history you're after this is the place. Or, y'know, if you got Storyteller as a kid and remember the story of the Fairy Flag then you may want to come here and see THE REAL FLAG ITSELF! I cried with happiness, I am not ashamed of that
Michael Ramsay (2 years ago)
Nice and modern looking castle with plenty of historical artifacts and antiques inside. Film on the history of the MacLeod clan is also playing in a back room. Few good spots for photos of the castle. Top floor is prohibited for public access. 4 or 5 different gardens to wander through to the left side of the castle which are beautifully landscaped. All for £14.
Steven Belucz (2 years ago)
Dunvegan Castle and Gardens makes for a wonderful day out and we loved every minute of it! We did the seal trips: the guide was extremely informative and we loved seeing the seals up close. The gardens were well maintained and absolutely stunning. The castle itself was a great experience. There is plenty of information about the stately home and the history of the MacLeod clan! Overall, a great trip!
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