Castle Tioram ruins sits on the tidal island Eilean Tioram in Loch Moidart, Lochaber. The castle is the traditional seat of Clan MacDonald of Clan Ranald, a branch of Clan Donald. It was seized by Government forces around 1692 when Clan Chief Allan of Clanranald joined the Jacobite Court in France, despite having sworn allegiance to the British Crown. A small garrison was stationed in the castle until the Jacobite Uprising of 1715 when Allan recaptured and torched it, purportedly to keep it out of the hands of Hanoverian forces. It has been unoccupied since that time, although there are some accounts suggesting it was partially inhabited thereafter including storage of firearms from the De Tuillay in the 1745 Jacobite Uprising and Lady Grange's account of her kidnapping.

The curtain wall is believed to date from the 13th century whilst the tower and other interior buildings are of 15th to 17th century construction. Amie mac Ruari is said to have extended the castle in the 14th century.

The castle is now in extremely poor condition and in 1998 was closed to the public at the request of Highland Council; a major structural collapse occurred at the north west curtain wall in 2000.

The castle can be reached on foot across the tidal causeway, but there is no access to the interior because of the risk of falling masonry.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dom Cardwell (3 years ago)
One of our favourite days out when we're in the area. Beautiful scenery with great beaches for playing as well as a cliff walk along the waterfront.
Joanne Hackett (3 years ago)
Loved it, very peaceful lovely day in June. For some reason I always remember this day, I’ve been on lots of walks and seen lots of castles but I really loved this day, there’s something about this place but can’t put my finger on exactly what. The castle it’s self isn’t that impressive and the views are lovely but not spectacular, but even so it’s become one of my most memorable days, absolutely loved it would go back in a heart beat.
Roman Markovski (3 years ago)
This is worth a long long drive, you can walk around the castle on the cliffs and the view is stunning.
Papa Zappa (3 years ago)
Ruined castle in fabulous setting. Take a picnic with the family, walk to the castle and climb up for great views.
David Punter (3 years ago)
A beautiful, historical castle in the West Highlands. The castle is situated on a tidal island, so take care not to get stranded! While the castle itself is in ruins, it is still quite spectacular to behold, and with a lovely sandy beach to sit and look out from, and Scotland's magnificent coastline to admire, it's a great place to explore and picnic at. There is even a small car park next to the beach (can get busy during the summer months).
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