Talisker distillery is an Island single malt Scotch whisky distillery based in Carbost — the only distillery on the Isle of Skye. The distillery is operated by United Distillers and Vintners for Diageo, and is marketed as part of their Classic Malts series.

The distillery was founded in 1830 by Hugh and Kenneth MacAskill, and built in 1831 at Carbost after a number of false starts on other sites when they acquired the lease of Talisker House from the MacLeod of MacLeod. The distillery was rebuilt 1880–87 and extended in 1900. It was rebuilt in 1960 after a stillhouse fire completely destroyed the distillery. The distillery operates five stills; two wash stills and three spirit stills. All the stills use worm tubs (condensing coils) rather than a modern condenser, which are believed to give the whisky a 'fuller' flavour (itself an indication of higher sugar content). During this early period, the whisky was produced using a triple distilling method, but changed to the more conventional double distilling in 1928. Talisker was acquired by Distillers Company in 1925 and is now part of Diageo. After the 1960 fire, five exact replicas of the original stills were constructed to preserve the original Talisker flavour. In 1972 the stills were converted to steam heating and the maltings floor was demolished. Talisker’s water comes from springs directly above the distillery via a network of pipes and wells.

The malted barley used in production comes from Muir of Ord. Talisker has an unusual feature—swan neck lye pipes. A loop in the pipes takes the vapour from the stills to the worm tubs so some of the alcohol already condenses before it reaches the cooler. It then runs back in to the stills and is distilled again. Talisker now has an annual output of three and a half million litres of spirit.

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Founded: 1830
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4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jonathan Matthew Jeyaratnam Berry (14 months ago)
We arrived today during the silent season and were initially disappointed to realise full tours were not available but Duncan went out of his way to show us the warehouse and provide a detailed explanation of the distillation process. The matured whisky flight was a highlight and was nicely finished by the whisky infused chocolate ganache.
Michael Farley (14 months ago)
Stopped by the visitor center despite the distillery/tour being closed due to the quiet month. Very worthwhile! Informative, friendly and very helpful staff inside to help talk you through the various bottles they offer. Delicious! Tastings were between 4.50-7 pounds for most of the bottles you can try. They also had a chocolate ganache hot drink on offer.
Liz Dowding (14 months ago)
Great place to visit, it was so much fun. The staff are super friendly and they know their whiskey. The gift shop was lovely and getting the talisker pins at the end of the tour way lovely. Even the bar area was nice and it has the history of talisker written around the edge. Great visit!
Anton von Borries (2 years ago)
Very nice distillery with friendly people. We went to the whisky and chocolate tour for £30 each and had a great time. You get to walk through most of the distillery rooms with lots of opportunities to ask questions and then a tasting of 3 whiskies with paired chocolates afterwards. Can definitely recommend this.
Mark Galla (2 years ago)
£8 for a 45 minute tour. I felt this was good value. Lots of facts about whisky that I didn't know; worth visiting if you have an interest in whisky. The Oyster Shed is a few minutes walk along the road and is well worth a visit to round things off.
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