Knock Castle, also known as Caisteal Chamuis is a former stronghold of the MacDonalds. Currently the castle is in ruins; it consists of an old 15th century keep of which one part, a window, remains to some height with traces of later buildings.

The castle was constructed by the Clan MacLeod and later captured by the Clan MacDonald in the late 15th century. Ownership of the castle passed between the two clans several times. It was remodelled in 1596 by the MacDonalds. By 1689 the castle was abandoned and started to decay. Most of the stones were then used for nearby buildings.

It is claimed by tradition that the castle is haunted by a Green Lady, a gruagach - a ghost associated with the fortunes of the family who occupy the castle. The ghost will appear happy if good news is to come; if there is bad news she will weep. The castle is also said to have had a glaistig, a spirit which is said to have a particular concern with caring for the livestock.

There is no way to get to Knock Castle directly by vehicle. There is a private road just off the A851 that leads down toward working farm buildings. The trail to the castle can be found by following the road to a livestock gate. Hidden in the vegetation on the right side of the pathway is a small wooden picket gate covered with lichen. On the other side of the gate is a faint trail that will eventually lead across a river to the castle, passing in front of a very old red-roofed farm building. The easiest approach to the castle is by following the trail upward after passing the farm building. On the right hand side after the farm building are the remains of what appears to be a blacksmith's forge.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Ruins in United Kingdom

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