The Ardbeg distillery has been producing whisky since 1798, and began commercial production in 1815. Like most Scottish distilleries, for most of its history, its whisky was produced for use in blended whisky, rather than as a single malt. Production was halted in 1981, but resumed on a limited basis in 1989 and continued at a low level through late 1996. The distillery was bought and reopened by Glenmorangie plc (owned by the French company LVMH) with production resuming in 1997.

Ardbeg Distillery produces a heavily peated Islay whisky. The distillery uses malted barley sourced from the maltings in Port Ellen.

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Address

Pier Road, Islay, United Kingdom
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Founded: 1815
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Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cookie Suarez (2 years ago)
Great , personal tour! It is wonderful going during low season. Everyone was very friendly and our host a young lady (forget her name) was very knowledgeable and friendly! My partner enjoyed the tasting and had a great experiencing. We then had a lovely lunch in the quiet cafe. Great area to spend a good few hours. Will return...... when its quiet again.
Tyler Augustine (2 years ago)
I love Argbed. The most authentic, traditional scotch you can buy. Thank you Emma!
Tom Hearn (3 years ago)
Sadly we turned up at the distillery in the off season so it was obviously closed, but one of the guys working there, Neil, saw us and said he would show us around. He took time out of his day to give us a mini tour of the place which was amazing. We really couldn't believe it and he had made our weekend. Thanks a lot Neil. Customer for life.
aren larsen (3 years ago)
Best £6 tour on the island! The cafe has very well prepared local dishes and the staff are friendly and fun. Highly recommend you plan this as a several hour part of your day!
Joel Carlson (3 years ago)
Missed the tour but the Cafe lunch was 5 stars. Delicious food and a small flight of whiskies. Beautiful grounds. A short, pastoral walk from Laggavulin.
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