Bowmore Distillery

Islay, United Kingdom

Bowmore distillery produces scotch whisky on the isle of Islay. It was established in 1779 by a local merchant, John P. Simpson, before passing into the ownership of the Mutter family, a family of German descent. James Mutter, head of the family, also had farming interests and was Vice Consul representing the Ottoman Empire, Portugal, and Brazil through their Glasgow consulates. There are no records that pinpoint the date Mutter acquired the distillery from Simpson. Mutter would introduce a number of innovative processes to the distillery during his tenure and even had a small iron steam ship built to import barley and coal from the mainland and to export the whisky to Glasgow.

The distillery was bought from the Mutter family in 1925 by J.B. Sheriff & Co. and remained under their ownership until being purchased by Inverness-based William Grigor & Son, Ltd. in 1950. During the World Wars the Bowmore Distillery halted production, and hosted the RAF Coastal Command for much of World War II, Coastal Command operated flying boats from Loch Indaal on Anti-submarine warfare missions.

Bowmore Distillery sources as much barley as possible from on the island of Islay, but there are insufficient quantities produced to satisfy the distillery's demand, so barley is also imported from the mainland. The distillery retains a traditional floor malting, but this also lacks sufficient capacity; the barley imported from the mainland is normally already malted. The distillery has an annual capacity of 2,000,000 litres, with fermentation undertaken in traditional wooden washbacks before the liquid is passed through two wash stills and then through two spirit stills.

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Founded: 1779
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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anna Gunn (11 months ago)
We came here on our honeymoon. The staff was very nice and knowledgeable. It was in a beautiful setting too. It was definitely worth the trip. Loved every moment here.
Tobiasz Siemiński (11 months ago)
Great place for every whisky fan. We got a free set of samples during visiting the shop because of covid. Cheers to all Bowmore stuff!
Stephen Page (12 months ago)
Great whisky, great staff, great experience.
Saeed Total (13 months ago)
The Best Whiskey
Leon Gelderblom (13 months ago)
Well, I have to say that I have never been a Bowmore fan and visiting Bowmore distillery in person tasting whisky’s you can’t find in the shops have changed my view and mind. What played a big part too was these two ladies; their attitude, knowledge and friendliness to assist and help where their can, even during these strict times. Well done ladies and thank you so much for taking the time in making this a great experience.
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