Whisky Distilleries in Highlands

Jura Distillery

Jura distillery is a Scotch whisky distillery on the island of Jura. Even though the distillery didn"t open until 1810, the people of Jura were entitled to distill whisky for personal consumption, until a ban was introduced in 1781. The distillery fell into disrepair, but in the 1960s two local estate owners Robin Fletcher and Tony Riley-Smith rebuilt the distillery, employing architect William Delme-Evans. By 1963 t ...
Founded: 1810 | Location: Isle of Jura, United Kingdom

Ardbeg Distillery

The Ardbeg distillery has been producing whisky since 1798, and began commercial production in 1815. Like most Scottish distilleries, for most of its history, its whisky was produced for use in blended whisky, rather than as a single malt. Production was halted in 1981, but resumed on a limited basis in 1989 and continued at a low level through late 1996. The distillery was bought and reopened by Glenmorangie plc (owned b ...
Founded: 1815 | Location: Islay, United Kingdom

Bowmore Distillery

Bowmore distillery produces scotch whisky on the isle of Islay. It was established in 1779 by a local merchant, John P. Simpson, before passing into the ownership of the Mutter family, a family of German descent. James Mutter, head of the family, also had farming interests and was Vice Consul representing the Ottoman Empire, Portugal, and Brazil through their Glasgow consulates. There are no records that pinpoint the date ...
Founded: 1779 | Location: Islay, United Kingdom

Bruichladdich Distillery

Bruichladdich Distillery produces mainly single malt Scotch whisky, but has also offered artisanal gin. It is owned by Rémy Cointreau and is one of eight working distilleries on the island. Bruichladdich was built in 1881 by the Harvey brothers on the shore of Loch Indaal. The Harveys were a dynastic whisky family that had owned two Glasgow distilleries since 1770. Using an inheritance, the three brothers combined ...
Founded: 1881 | Location: Islay, United Kingdom

Bunnahabhain Distillery

The Bunnahabhain Distillery was founded in 1881 near Port Askaig on Islay. The village of Bunnahabhain was founded to house its workers. The Bunnahabhain is one of the milder single malt Islay whiskies available and its taste varies greatly from other spirits to be found on the island of Islay, off the west coast of Scotland.
Founded: 1881 | Location: Islay, United Kingdom

Highland Park Distillery

Highland Park distillery is the most northerly whisky distillery in Scotland, half a mile farther north than that at Scapa distillery. The distillery was founded in 1798, presumably by Magnus Eunson. The name of this whisky does not refer to the area of Scotland known as The Highlands, but rather to the fact that the distillery was founded on an area called "High Park" distinguished from a lower area nearby. Hi ...
Founded: 1798 | Location: Orkney, United Kingdom

Talisker Distillery

Talisker distillery is an Island single malt Scotch whisky distillery based in Carbost — the only distillery on the Isle of Skye. The distillery is operated by United Distillers and Vintners for Diageo, and is marketed as part of their Classic Malts series. The distillery was founded in 1830 by Hugh and Kenneth MacAskill, and built in 1831 at Carbost after a number of false starts on other sites when they acquired ...
Founded: 1830 | Location: Isle of Skye, United Kingdom

Tobermory Distillery

Tobermory distillery is a Scotch whisky distillery founded as Ledaig distillery in 1798 by John Sinclair. The current buildings were constructed during that first period of occupation, and were licensed in 1823. It was acquired by John Hopkins & Co in 1890, and by Distillers Company in 1916 before closing in 1930 following a drop in the demand for whisky due to ten years of prohibition in the United States. The only d ...
Founded: 1798 | Location: Isle of Mull, United Kingdom

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Goseck Circle

The Goseck circle is a Neolithic circle structure. It may be the oldest and best known of the Circular Enclosures associated with the Central European Neolithic. It also may be one of the oldest Solar observatories in the world. It consists of a set of concentric ditches 75 metres across and two palisade rings containing gates in places aligned with sunrise and sunset on the solstice days.

Its construction is dated to c. 4900 BC, and it seems to have remained in use until 4600 BC. This corresponds to the transitional phase between the Neolithic Linear Pottery and Stroke-ornamented ware cultures. It is one of a larger group of so-called Circular Enclosures in the Elbe and Danube region, most of which show similar alignments.

Excavators also found the remains of what may have been ritual fires, animal and human bones, and a headless skeleton near the southeastern gate, that could be interpreted as traces of human sacrifice or specific burial ritual. There is no sign of fire or of other destruction, so why the site was abandoned is unknown. Later villagers built a defensive moat following the ditches of the old enclosure.

The Goseck ring is one of the best preserved and extensively investigated of the many similar structures built at around the same time. Traces of the original configuration reveal that the Goseck ring consisted of four concentric circles, a mound, a ditch, and two wooden palisades. The palisades had three sets of gates facing southeast, southwest, and north. At the winter solstice, observers at the center would have seen the sun rise and set through the southeast and southwest gates.

Archaeologists generally agree that Goseck circle was used for observation of the course of the Sun in the course of the solar year. Together with calendar calculations, it allowed coordinating an easily judged lunar calendar with the more demanding measurements of a solar calendar.