Kilmory Knap Chapel is a 13th-century Christian chapel, located at the tiny hamlet of Kilmory. When the roof was lost the building was used as a burial enclosure. The structure was re-roofed in 1934 to hold a large collection of Early Christian cross slabs, late medieval graveslabs and standing crosses of West Highland type, from the 14th to 16th centuries. The chapel is an important historical site of Clan Macmillan (of Knap). In the church is Macmillan's Cross, a well-preserved piece of medieval carving, portraying the Chief of the clan with hunting dogs. The chapel is cared for by Historic Scotland on behalf of the State.

Simon Brighton associates Kilmory Knap Chapel with the Knights Templar suggesting the area may have given refuge to Templars fleeing persecution in France.

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Address

Knapdale, United Kingdom
See all sites in Knapdale

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Caroline Crook (10 months ago)
Beautiful spot and amazing early grave markers
Steve M (11 months ago)
Nicely done. A glass roof allows the daylight to pour in, windows with grates instead of glass allows the fresh air in. Not stuffy or dark. Why don't they do this to more old churches?
Christopher Whalen (12 months ago)
There’s a perspex roof here, so it would be a good place to shelter during a rain shower.
Mayu Amakura (12 months ago)
A very sweet little Chapel. It is in the middle on no where though but the beach nearby is beautiful too.
Stevie Douglas (13 months ago)
Really off the beaten track worth seeking out though. Remember to lock the door after you.
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