Ballochroy is a megalithic site in Kintyre on the Argyll peninsula. It consists of three vertical stones, side by side, aligned with various land features 11–31 km away.

Alexander Thom, known for his work on Stonehenge, maintained that the great length between the stones and the features of distant landscape lent precision to pinpointing the midsummer and winter solstices for ancient observers.

These three stones are considered the most spectacular set of megalithic monuments that cluster around south Argyll. It is possible that this last, smallest, stone may have been broken off at the top. The line of stones is orientated north-east to south-west.

As with many megalithic sites, the current theories concerning the exact use of the stones at Ballochroy are somewhat controversial.

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