Saddell Castle was built by David Hamilton, Bishop of Argyll, between 1508 and 1512 from the stones of the ruined Saddell Abbey. The castle was gifted to James Hamilton, 2nd Earl of Arran by Bishop James Hamilton, as payment of debts and taxes in 1556. The Earl of Arran exchanged it with the Chief of Clan MacDonald of Dunnyveg, James MacDonald in exchange for James's lands on the Isle of Arran. The castle was ransacked and burnt in 1558 by Thomas Radclyffe, 3rd Earl of Sussex, Lord Deputy of Ireland under orders of Queen Mary I of England in retaliation of James's involvement in Ireland against the English. The castle was later rebuilt and enlarged together with a trap door in the main entrance passage, which upon activation, sent unwanted visitors into a dungeon which had no exits. In 1607, the Clan Donald lands in Kintyre, including Saddell, were conveyed by King James VI to Archibald Campbell, 7th Earl of Argyll. The castle fell into disrepair when Saddell House was built c. 1774. The castle was bought and restored by the Landmark Trust, which now rents it out as a self-catering property.

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Founded: 1508-1512
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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User Reviews

Martin Arnold (4 months ago)
Such a beautiful place to visit. Lovely walk from the carpark to the castle. Then a short walk along the beach to the cottage. Then head back to see GRIP (sculpture). The castle looks and sounds like a great place to stay, spoke with some guests that were staying there. Definitely worth a try to stay here.
Keith Duncan (5 months ago)
Great place to visit scene of the Mull of Kintyre video lovely beach and surroundings
Sue Harrison (7 months ago)
What a fantastic place to stay, ideal for a family gathering especially after lockdown or making any kind of celebration extra special. Stunning scenery. Bookable through Landmark Trust
Adrian Bond (14 months ago)
Landmark Trust property, so you can hire it for 3, 4 or 7 days. Saddell Castle is located right on Saddell beach. This is the location where they shot the video for the 1979 hit Wings song 'Mull of Kintyre'. Parking is right at the entrance of the saddell estate about 4 cars only, and it is about a 10 minute walk to get to the beach, if you dawdle. But it is worth it! Once on the beach you get amazing views and lots of wildlife, seals, too many sea birds to mention and the odd otters too. If you are driving down the 'long and winding road' from Skipness to campletown (not the faster straight road) it is worth 45 minutes or so to enjoy the beach and maybe get over a little car sickness! Views of Aaran are great on a clear day...
Adrian Bond (14 months ago)
Landmark Trust property, so you can hire it for 3, 4 or 7 days. Saddell Castle is located right on Saddell beach. This is the location where they shot the video for the 1979 hit Wings song 'Mull of Kintyre'. Parking is right at the entrance of the saddell estate about 4 cars only, and it is about a 10 minute walk to get to the beach, if you dawdle. But it is worth it! Once on the beach you get amazing views and lots of wildlife, seals, too many sea birds to mention and the odd otters too. If you are driving down the 'long and winding road' from Skipness to campletown (not the faster straight road) it is worth 45 minutes or so to enjoy the beach and maybe get over a little car sickness! Views of Aaran are great on a clear day...
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