Audru Church, which was built in 1680, is one of the few 17th century rural churches left in Estonia. It was built under the patronage of great church builder Magnus Gabriel de la Gardie, who built 37 churches in Sweden.

The baroque-style plastered church has a tall and slim gothic tower. A beautiful vaulted ceiling hangs above the spacious church hall and the church's benches, pulpit, altar wall and grid, and the organ balcony on the western wall all date back to the 19th century. Lady of the manor Pilar von Pilchau donated Gustav Biermann’s altar painting 'Christ on the Cross' to the church in 1872.

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Tõstamaa mnt, Audru, Estonia
See all sites in Audru

Details

Founded: 1680
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Swedish Empire (Estonia)

More Information

visitparnu.ee
www.rannatee.ee

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5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andres Kotkas (2 months ago)
Väga vana
Sevo Rohtla (3 months ago)
Алексей Орлов (8 months ago)
Лютеранская церковь, красивая.
Anatoly Ko (6 years ago)
Tõstamaa mnt 5, Audru, Pärnumaa 58.412616, 24.357333 ‎58° 24' 45.42", 24° 21' 26.40" Построенная в 1680 году Аудруская церковь – одна из немногих сохранившихся в Эстонии деревенских церквей 17 века. Покрытую светлой штукатуркой церковь в стиле барокко венчает башня с высоким готическим шатровым завершением. Над просторным церковным залом возвышается красивый зеркальный сводчатый потолок, интерьер – скамейки, кафедра, алтарная стена и решетка, а также органный балкон на западной стене относятся к 19 веку. Алтарную живопись Густава Бирманна «Распятый Христос» подарила церкви хозяйка Аудруской усадьбы Пилар фон Пилхау. Интересно знать! Аудруская церковь построена под патронажем известного строителя церквей Магнуса Габриэля де ла Гарди (построил в Швеции 37 церквей).
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