St. Elizabeth's Lutheran Church

Pärnu, Estonia

The Lutheran church named after Empress Elizabethis one of the most significant Baroque-style churches in Estonia. It was built betweenn 1744-1747 under the guidance of J. H. Güterbock from Riga.

The neo-gothic pulpit and altar were made in 1850; the altarpiece (“Resurrection”) dating from 1854 was completed in Van der Kann’s workshop in Rotterdam. In 1893, the wooden building of the oldest theatre of the town (Küün) in the southern part of the plot was demolished and the southern wing was erected (designed by R. Häusermann, a construction master from Riga). The organ, built in 1929 by H. Kolbe of Riga, is among the best in Estonia. In 1995 the extension with offices was completed (architect R. Luhse).

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Address

Nikolai 22, Pärnu, Estonia
See all sites in Pärnu

Details

Founded: 1744-1747
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

More Information

www.tourism360.net

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aili Haas (6 months ago)
Church for concerts, good acustics
Eiliki Pukk (2 years ago)
Beautiful old church. Not in so good condition from outside but beautiful inside. It has interesting shape. Worth to visit. No entrance fee. Worth to visit.
Eiliki Pukk (2 years ago)
Beautiful old church. Not in so good condition from outside but beautiful inside. It has interesting shape. Worth to visit. No entrance fee. Worth to visit.
Marek Laanisto (2 years ago)
Ok
Baston Baston (3 years ago)
Full of light,nice church that making perfomans/concerts some times.
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