The Red Tower (which is actually white) is the only defence tower left from medieval Hanseatic city of New-Pärnu. It is the oldest city’s architectural monument and was used as the prison. According to the chronics, in 14th century Pärnu was encircled by a fortified wall with many towers: the round Viliand Tower, also know as the White Tower, in the north-eastern corner and Red Tower in the south-eastern corner. There may have been also the Holy Spirit’s Tower. After a well-needed reconstruction in 1893 it acquired its current look.

The tower got it's name by the red lining covering both its inside and outside. In 1624, the tower had four floors and a six meter deep prison floor. Three floors been preserved. Red Tower was restored in 1973-1980 without it's original brick lining.

References: Visit Pärnu, Meeting.lv

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Hommiku 11, Pärnu, Estonia
See all sites in Pärnu

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

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