The Red Tower (which is actually white) is the only defence tower left from medieval Hanseatic city of New-Pärnu. It is the oldest city’s architectural monument and was used as the prison. According to the chronics, in 14th century Pärnu was encircled by a fortified wall with many towers: the round Viliand Tower, also know as the White Tower, in the north-eastern corner and Red Tower in the south-eastern corner. There may have been also the Holy Spirit’s Tower. After a well-needed reconstruction in 1893 it acquired its current look.

The tower got it's name by the red lining covering both its inside and outside. In 1624, the tower had four floors and a six meter deep prison floor. Three floors been preserved. Red Tower was restored in 1973-1980 without it's original brick lining.

References: Visit Pärnu, Meeting.lv

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Hommiku 11, Pärnu, Estonia
See all sites in Pärnu

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

George On tour (2 years ago)
An international exhibition of historical weapons and iron troops has been opened in the defense tower of Pärnu's oldest preserved castle in the summer. The exhibition is worthy of its name, as many items of the collection have belonged to royal families or their bodyguards. On the two floors of the red tower, more than 70 original pieces of the exhibition are exhibited at 750 to 1800. Each item has its own unique story and symbolizes the design of its era. On the first floor of the Red Tower, there is an Oriental display of weapons from Persian, India and Japan, and it is possible to preview the Samurai battle equipment, clothing and weapons. The second floor is in the history of Europe, giving an overview of weapons and ironmongery from the early spring to the beginning of the 1800s.
Johanna Blom (2 years ago)
I expected it to be more well taken care of consider its so old and an important mark for the city.
Matias Mustonen (2 years ago)
A very beautiful exhibition of historical arms and armour
Your assistant in market (3 years ago)
Only good thing there is Lounge Hoov.
kristofer mäger (4 years ago)
Historical place, must visit.Clean and good view.Interesting place.
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