Borġ in-Nadur site contains a megalithic temple as well as the remains of a Bronze Age village which includes the earliest fortifications of Malta. A temple was constructed in the area in around 2500 BC, during the Tarxien phase of Maltese prehistory and the last phase of the Temple period. The architecture shows a typical four-apse plan, although the wall made up of megaliths is quite low. The temple's entrance has two upright megaliths which can still be seen. A large covered niche stands close to the entrance but its capstone is now broken into three pieces.

The temple lacks the artistic decorations associated with similar temples from the era such as Tarxien Temples or Ħaġar Qim. A small cemetery is located about 9m away from the main temple.

In the Bronze Age period, a flourishing village colonized the site of the former temple as well as the surrounding area, which had since been abandoned. The temple was converted into a group of dwellings, and various huts were built in the area around it. The huts' foundations still exist, but they cannot be seen today since they were reburied after being excavated and studied. Scattered sherds were found in a large area all around the temple. Some of these were Mycenaean in origin, indicating that there was direct or indirect contact between the Maltese and Aegean civilization.

The inhabitants fortified their settlement with a 4.5m D-shaped bastion in order to bar access to the village. The wall was built facing inland, showing that the people living in the village were more afraid of attacks from the land than from the sea. After the area was excavated, the wall was not reburied and it still standing. This is believed to be the oldest surviving fortification in Malta.

The cart ruts and silos located in the area around Borġ in-Nadur are also believed to date from the Bronze Age era.

The temple was discovered in the 16th century. The French cleric John Quintin noticed the various scattered megaliths and ruined structures and identified them as the ruins of a sanctuary of Hercules. The first excavations took place two centuries later, when Annetto Caruana dug various trenches inside the temple complex and discovered the Bronze Age fortification.

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Details

Founded: 2500 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Malta

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dandin M (3 years ago)
5euro entrance fee, which is OK no problem but the place need maintenance, lots of it!
Mark Borg (3 years ago)
Small temple building... important historically but nor much to actually see.
Radu Savin (4 years ago)
Interesting place after seeing the other prehistoric spot in Malta
Martin Helmrich-Knabe (4 years ago)
Nice small neolithic temple
Frans van Avendonk (4 years ago)
Highly interesting and special site
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