Palazzo Falson

Mdina, Malta

The splendid Palazzo Falson, which is one of the oldest surviving homes in Malta, built in the 13th century, has a dazzling and extensive private collection on display, including furniture, watches, silver, jewellery, oriental rugs, paintings, armoury and books.

The Palazzo is named after its 16th century owner Vice Admiral Michele Falsone, although the amazing collection was brought together by researcher, philanthropist and artist Captain Olof Gollcher (1889-1962), who bought the Palazzo in 1927.

After your visit, be sure to have a break at the palazzo’s splendid rooftop café, which commands a panoramic view of Malta, the open sea and the prominent dome of the nearby Mdina Cathedral.

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Address

Triq Mesquita, Mdina, Malta
See all sites in Mdina

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Malta

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yanjun Wang (18 months ago)
Fantastic museum with rich cultural and historical exhibits even the Maltese style building.Many treasures, especially a French clock with only 10-honr scale and another one in Louvre.Don’t miss it when you visit Mdina.
Julian-Nikolas Riedel (18 months ago)
Strangely enough no babies or children under 6 allowed. Not really inclusive. Bad
Ognian Dimitrov (2 years ago)
Not a bad little palace, it is rather a large house, located in the old town of Mdina. From the top floor there is a nice view to the rooftops of Mdina.
K F (2 years ago)
It is not much worth as its entrance fee. Its audio guide device was interesting.
Nana Tivadaru (2 years ago)
Great collections and beautiful house to visit
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