Selmun Palace was built by the Monte di Redenzione degli Schiavi, a charity that was founded during the reign of Grand Master Alof de Wignacourt in 1607 to finance the redemption of Christians enslaved by Ottomans or Barbary corsairs. The land on which the palace was built was originally a coastal lookout post, and was donated to the Monte di Redenzione by Caterina Vitale in 1619. The palace used to be rented out to knights of the Order of Saint John as a place to relax and hunt wild rabbits, which were commonly found in the area. The rent money contributed to the redemption fund.

The palace itself was built the sometime in the 18th century, although the exact date of construction is not known. The earliest record of the structure is on a 1783 map, when it was referred to as Torre Nuova (new tower). The palace's architect is unknown, but it is sometimes attributed to Domenico Cachia.

Selmun Palace is an example of Baroque architecture. It has a square plan with four pseudo-bastions on each side, the design of which was inspired by the Verdala Palace and the Wignacourt towers. These bastions as well as fake embrasures were mainly built for aesthetic purposes, and the structure was never intended for military use. Despite this, it served as a deterrent for corsairs looking for a potential landing spot, since it looked like a military outpost when viewed from the sea. The main facade has three doors, with the main one being surrounded by a decorative portal. An ornate window on the upper floor and a bell-cot on the roof surmount the main door. A balcony surrounds the perimeter of the entire building.

A chapel dedicated to Our Lady of Ransom was located within the palace. In the 1980s, a new chapel with the same dedication was built outside the palace.

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Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta
See all sites in Mellieħa

Details

Founded: 18th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Malta

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Ivan Bednarik (2 years ago)
Very nice walk under the palace. There are agri sites and gardens. Beautiful coast and quiet beaches very messy after hurricane..loads of plastics..
Slawek Z (2 years ago)
Lovely charming place. I wish we could get inside to tour the palace.
G Payton (2 years ago)
Beautiful! I wish we could get inside to tour the palace.
Khloe's Kitchen (3 years ago)
Lovely area. Lots of green area. Beautiful scenery ❤️
Jamez Chan (3 years ago)
A fortress/ hunting lodge of the old knights. Located within close proximity of Melleiha, it's not your usual touristic site, you can't enter it, but it does give a lovely view of Saint Paul's Bay. The relics around it are also with little information board that gives you brief intro on life living in a farming village in the past.
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