Scourmont Abbey

Chimay, Belgium

Scourmont Abbey is a Trappist monastery famous for its spiritual life, and the Chimay Brewery which it runs, one of the few Trappist breweries.

In 1844, Jean-Baptiste Jourdain, the priest of Virelles, suggested that the wild plateau of Scourmont was a suitable place for a monastery. However, all previous attempts to cultivate the barren plateau had failed. Fr. Jourdain obtained support for the proposed foundation from Prince Joseph II de Chimay, the abbot of Westmalle Abbey and Westvleteren Abbey. Six years later, on 25 July 1850, a small group of monks from Westvleteren settled on Scourmont and founded a priory.

A lot of hard work was required to transform the barren soil of Scourmont into fertile farmland. A farm was created around the monastery, as well as a cheese-making factory and a brewery. On 24 February 1871, Pope Pius IX granted the priory the status of abbey and it was inaugurated on 7 July 1871. The present church of the abbey dates from 1950.

The famous beers and cheeses of Scourmont Abbey are marketed under the trade name of Chimay, after the village where the abbey is located.

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Details

Founded: 1850
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mayee Riemens (2 years ago)
A quite well maintained place famous for its exquisite Chimay beer. Don’t expect to visit a brewery, it is only open to see the church and central garden which are both wonderful. Take a 10 min walk to the “auberge” to taste the beers!
Alexandre Halbach (2 years ago)
Nice quiet place
Jeroen Meirlaen (2 years ago)
Best trappist
Krunoslava Gerbl (2 years ago)
Nice and calm place to visit before enjoying the beers this Trappist monestery produces.
Julio Caban Jr (2 years ago)
This is a Monastery for the Trappiste Monks. The place it's gorgeous. This is where the Chimay beer is made.
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