Grand-Hornu is an old industrial mining complex in Hornu in the municipality of Boussu. It was built by Henri De Gorge between 1810 and 1830. It is a unique example of functional town-planning. Today it is owned by the province of Hainaut, which houses temporary exhibitions in the buildings. As one of four Major Mining Sites of Wallonia, UNESCO designated it a World Heritage Site in 2012

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Founded: 1810-1830
Category: Industrial sites in Belgium

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Albert Zaragozá (2 years ago)
Well worth the visit. Original architecture and nice exhibitions.
Irene (2 years ago)
Nice place, really interesting
Mia Fajarani (2 years ago)
The art gallery of gran hornu has a really big place. Its like an ex of castile, the architecture are sooo nice. Its really cold when you came on auntumn outside the building. This is a great place to have an art exhibition. They have so many rooms for any kind of exhibition, like painting or instalation art. Its a good view on autumn tho
Asmayani Kusrini (2 years ago)
The best contemporary art museum in Belgium constructed from the ex-coal mine. The site and the museum is an interesting mix from historical point of view, geographical as well as from artistic choice. It's a must for people who are interested into Belgium, history and art.
Lise Galuga (3 years ago)
Interesting site. Has been converted to an art gallery with an admission fee. But you can still walk the grounds of this old mining site (although nothing of the actual mines is still visible) for free. The 2 euro audioguide is well worth the money. Loved the storytelling!
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