Binche Town Hall

Binche, Belgium

Binche's town hall and belfry dates back to the 14th century. Burnt down by the French in 1554, the hall was soon restored in a Renaissance style by architect Du Broeucq. In the 18th century, the architect Dewelz covered the building with a neoclassical façade but, after major restoration works in 1901, the town hall regained its Renaissance appearance. A Baroque onion dome crowns the belfry. The belfry houses the carillon, which includes several 16th-century bells. The coats of arms of Charles V and his sister Mary of Hungary adorn the building. The belfry is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Belfries in Belgium and France.

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Founded: 16th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Belgium

More Information

www.opt.be

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Victoria Vandebroek (2 years ago)
It might be time to change the hours on the internet home page ... otherwise nothing to say.
car sar (2 years ago)
There is often no one there which makes it fast but what are the employees are rude!
Andy Maljean (4 years ago)
Generally good reception and reduced waiting time. Possibility of taking photos of identity on site (photo booth).
Rodrigo D (7 years ago)
Beautiful townhall in this Belgian town famous for the costumes at their carnivals -Mardi Gras-
Rodrigo D (7 years ago)
Beautiful townhall in this Belgian town famous for the costumes at their carnivals -Mardi Gras-
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